NEWS

EZL4IL

mil

1111!

m

FINAL ISSUE

"THAT ' S ALL FOR NOW

TORONTO TIMEX- SINCLAIR USERS CLUB

Editorial

Well, this is it. The last issue of Sine-Link. Kind of sad.

After more than twelve years in publication we've run out of articles and steam.

It's nobody's fault. There just isn't enough interest to sustain either the newsletter or the club. The club executive is worn out and we don't have anyone else to hand our responsibilities over to.

The newsletter might have continued if there had been sufficient response from the out-of-town members in terms of articles, but none came in. Hugh was entertaining thoughts of continuing in a QL- only mode, but running a club and a newsletter is more than a one- man job and no one else offered to help.

For those of you readers with outstanding subscriptions, if you haven't already received a pro-rated refund, then you will soon.

To all of our members and supporters over the years, a hearty thank you. To the club executive, for years of dedication, WELL DONE!

That's all for now ...

p.s. The cover and this editorial were produced on a TS-2Q68 using Print Factory and Mscript and printed on a HP Deskjet 500 inkjet printer complete with an FX-80 emulator cartridge. Anything is possible with a Timex-Sinclair computer. J.T.

Jeff Taylor

Article Contributions

end in your articles by tape or disk and your inputs to:-

Magazine

DON LAMBERT

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Phone 219 925-1372

Z80 - The Spectrum Emulator for MSDOS by George Chambers

In the Sept I Oct 93 issue of Sine-Link we published a review of the Z80 Emulator for MSDOS machines. The review was or i g i nal I y published in the Long Island S/T Users Group nil, LISTing' ' . The author was John Pazmino. I had a copy of the shareware disk, and when I tried it in my 486 machine I was impressed with it's performance. I sent off the money and received a reg istered copy. Let me tell you a I ittle about that aspect.

I or iginal I y sent off an I nternat i ona I Postal Money Order for $15US. That was a mistake. The Postal Money Order bit, that is. Within ten days of my mailing the money order, I received my reg istered copy. But along with the disk, B.G. Services aka Brian Gaff, returned the money order. He told me that the banks there would only give him 2.70 UK Pounds, that is to say, about US $5. Brian suggested that I send UK Pounds cash. Which I did, forthwith.

Now, of course it was my fault. I should have, at the least, made the money order out in UK Pounds. But note this. They did send the disk in trust, and did it extreme I y fast. Ten days. That's faster than I can get anything from the USA.

Now to the Emulator itself. Well, John Pazmino has described it pretty well in his article so I won't duplicate what he said. I'll simply relate my exper iences with it to date.

I made up an interface cable so that I could load Spectrum/2068 tapes into the 486. This was pretty straight forward. One of the files on the disk contains a schemat ic. The interface requires 5 res istors and two capac itors. Two res istors were in European values, which interpret to a .047 mfd and .68 mfd mylar capac i-t or s. The cord requires a connector to plug into the 15-pin printer port on the 486, and two male connectors to plug into the tape recorder. They suggest that the components could be housed within the 15-pin connector shell. I was not sure that I could cope with that small an area so I put the components into a small plastic box. It worked well.

There is a tape test mode in the program; a sliding bar on the computer screen that shows the signal level coming from the tape player. You adjust the tape player and a variable resistor in the interface until the signal onscreen is the proper level. I was able to load programs from tape quite rout ine I y.

The simplest way to save programs is to capture the whole memory, saving it under whatever the program name is. The file is comp-ressed during the save, so that while the memory capture may be, say 45K, the compressed file will range anywhere from maybe 1 5K upwards.

One of the first things I did was to save some Spectrum games from tape. Very routine. One 3 1/2 disk held 41 game programs!

/ then moved a number of programs over, Tasword, Pro/F i I e, T imach ine, Master f i I e; and some of my own programs as well, I saved and loaded Tasword and Pro/File files via disks, and was able to print to the large printer,

I had to modify the Tasword program code in a couple of I ocat ions, since my copy had been adapted for the 2068, and a couple of CALLS were incorrect. Also I had to insert a CLEAR( RAMTOP ) instruct ion. With the Spectrum one has to be concerned with the Stack, I changed the Larken disk calls, to ones for the M icro-Dr i ves. And also I needed to open a new printer port, with an OPEN #3, 'f' instruction,

I have found that the PRO/FILE program needs some further mod if icat ion. So far I have been able to print out the membersh i p list, but the program fails when I try to make changes to the database, I have not searched for the problem yet,

interest ing I y, I found the Spectrum version of T imach i ne worked very well, I recompi I ed one of my old compiled programs to test it out, and found it worked per feet I y.

The documentat ion on the disk produces a document of about 50 pages, it is comprehensive, though like the Larken system documentat ion, it is rather terse. Takes a lot of studying to comprehend everything that is being said. Though I have the M icro-Dr ive LOAD/ SAVE processes pretty well sorted out, a complete understanding of the disk (pseudo-tape) process still eludes me, I'm working on it J

There are some minor irritations. This is in connection with certain keys. The keyboard conventions vary from country to contry.This shows up particularly in the punctuation characters in the top row of keys. The Emulator places the ( ) characters on keys 8 and 9, instead of the US/Canada convent ion of keys 9 and 0, And the and * need watching. But these are rather trifling matters.

Can J recommend the Emul ator? Most assured I y. It is a fine implementation. Ask me for a copy of the shareware. Best you state your wanted disk format. Or better still, send away for your reg istered copy to:

B,G, Services, 64 Roebuck Road, Chess ington, Surrey KT9 1JX England, Send 15 pounds UK, or $15 US,

There is some incentive to getting a reg istered copy. The share-ware copy does not contain the software needed for tape loading, nor does it provide for adjusting the Emulator speed on the faster MSDOS machines,

I'd be interested in hearing from any one else who makes use of the Emulator, Do drop me a line.

REVIEW OF Chris BoutaTs GENEALOGIST 3

Page 1

by Ittgh Howie

In a group of people gathered around the glowing embers of a fire of a winter evening, the talk can touch on many things, and invariably someone will say something which prompts another to say

"I remember " and the talk will often

turn to reminiscences of a family member, relation, or acquaintance, who did this, that or something else, then the tales start to flow as to who what where and when. And that is where a programme such as GENEALOGIST 3 comes into its own.

This is a programme by Chris Boutal of the United Kingdom. Great Britain. England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, call it what you wish. The lands of history and legend. The lands of brave Knights and Fair Damsels. The lands from where so many of us in Canada and the USA came . The land which so many still call "HOME" But do we real ly know where we came from?

We all know some of our ancestors, but "ian we put. it together in some order and sequence, with the correct dates and times and facts? Who married who, and who begat who?

GENEALOGIST 3 is the programme to do this for you. All you have to do is provide the data and enter it, and the programme takes over and does all the work for you.

Enter names and dates and relationships, and before you realise what has happened you will be able to see a "Tree" grow from almost nothing.

The system is very comprehensive. All your family records, Births, Deaths, Marriages, Burials are stored, and can be displayed on screen, or sent to the printer in many different formats to suit your specific requirements.

GENEALOGIST 3 will keep track of census returns and certificates, and any other detail you have in mind. It has very complete search and indexing facilities.

fou want to know your ancestors? your pedigree? Who are the heads of various family groups? Who you are? Where you

came from? No, it will not tell you where you are going, that's for you to solve. But I can vouch for this, it will make you want to KNOW the past! You will spend so much time in research into your family background, you will leave a lot of things unattended.

From the various Family Groups which you assemble as you enter data, a tree can be generated, and displayed on screen or paper for your perusal and reference . You can make amendments to the tree as you look at it, they can be made here or in the Family Group format. The Tree can be sent to the printer and this will give you a wonderful display of all the Ministers and Rogues and Vagabonds and Highwaymen, who are part of your heri tage .

GENEALOGIST 3 is for the Pointer Environment, but can also be operated very efficiently from the keyboard if you don't have a mouse. Selection of facility can be made by using the arrow keys, or by letter selection from the menus, or mouse. Very versatile.

I have had Genealogist version 1 and version 2. When Version 3 came along I debated whether I needed it, and after a lot of poking around in the recessed area of the wallet - I came up with a few moths and the necessary moolah to purchase version 3, and I have not regretted it for one instant.

It would appear that when so much keyboard work is required, that the constant work of moving a hand from mouse to keyboard and back again, would be rather tiresome, but this I have found not to be the case. When you are entering data, you will find that the arrow keys are fine and dandy for moving around. But when you start to RESEARCH the data, looking for cross-references etc., does that mouse ever scoot around the screen! Definitely - the mouse is a great advantage - but don't forget, if you have no mouse the programme still provides all the facilities required, and at a goodly speed also.

REVIEW OF Chris BoutaTs GENEALOGIST 3

Page

by Hugh Bowie

Speed, now that is something else to be discussed. The full programme requires at least 512 Kb memory, so that lets out Microdrive and bare bones QL . With Trump Card, you have the extra speed, and also the extra memory required. With the Gold Card which is what I use, I find that the programme is fast enough for me. With the Super Gold Card? I am afraid you might burn up the screen with the extra speed the Super is reputed to have.

But then again, we have an author who thinks of those with less than the epitome of QL's. We have an author who thinks of the person who only has the basic 128k machine (are there any left?) There must be a few somewhere as Chris has provided a Budget version of GENEALOGIST for those people. And this Budget version is on MDV or Disk! You want - you got !

Now say you have been working on an Archive based family, and having problems transferring it to this new system, then for a modest fee (very modest) Chris will convert that to GENEALOGIST for you.

For those who have been using one of the earlier versions of GENEALOGIST, the data made with those versions will not work with Version 3, but once again, all is provided for, there is a conversion programme provided. And it really does work, as I used it myself.

In the manual there is a tutorial family for you to type in, and after following the tutorial, you will have no problem in getting down to your own task. The manual is very well written indeed, with easy and clear instructions as to what to do, and when. There is an excellent "Command Reference" Section, where you can see what each command does, and where it is called from. Printed on pink paper in nice clear distinct black type, it may be thought that the pink paper could be a bit hard to read, but this is not the case, the manual is easy to read, easy to follow, and of great precision.

The programme will take all the data you like to enter, from the heads of

families, which is all that is really required, but also all your brothers and sisters and aunts and cousins. Just about anything you want to put in.

If you want a screen or paper copy of a family tree from the start, or from a midway point, to a midway point - that is what is available.

Let me say here and now, when I say you can have a copy, I mean that you can have a copy ON SCREEN or on PRINTER, so those terms are synonymous. When using the printer the option of Normal or Condensed type is available.

GENEALOGIST 3 will provide a geographical map of occurrences. This is based on the grid system in use in British road maps, and when I suggested to Chris that the programme was reaching the far corners of the earth where that grid system might not be in use, and that a Latitude & Longitude option be made available, Chris agreed and said that he would look into this, and perhaps introduce it at. a later date. But don't let this stop you from acquiring the programme. This is an enhancement that I do not require, and I wonder how many really do. I only introduce those comments to show how Chris has tried to provide everyone with what anyone would like. This "map" facility, will even tell you the distance between two points when using the grid system.

I almost forgot to tell you that it will even provide pictures to go with a family group. Say you a have a picture of your old Uncle Ned and Aunt Sarah at Xmas, you do have that picture? Then by use of a Video camera and a digitiser, you can save that picture on disk, and later project that picture on screen. There are even a couple pictures provided as an example. I can see this programme taking the place of slide shows. Do you remember them?

For those interested in Kings and Queens of Britain, a Royal Tree is provided, just so you see what a tree looks like.

REVIEW OF Chris BoutaTs GENEALOGIST 3

Page

by Hugh Bowie

Do you want to know who is related to whom, and what that relationship is? You got it! D'ya really need to know that "Jo Bio is the second cousin twice removed from Jenny Jewell"? Or that "Dan is the great-great-great-grandfather of Dave? The cross-reference is there.

For those occasions when the spelling of a surname has been changed over the years, that also has been taken care of, as multiple spellings are recognised.

The user is even allowed to make up a customised Research Report to suit ones own requirements, as before making the report, you are allowed to select the details (from a list of thirteen) you wish to appear in the report, but not only that, you are permitted to select whether the report should appear in row or column format .

There is even a "Verify" mode provided. Say you enter the birth of a parent as 1900 and the son as being born in 1905, this "verify" will tell you "40 and 35 have an unlikely generation gap". Plus many other things. (The programme gives each family member its own unique number)

Much of the data is available for export to the Psion suite of programmes. This is to enable you to do further processing that GENEALOGIST can't do. For example the Family Network and Research reports can be exported to Archive. Tree data can go to Abacus. Place/Time data can be exported to Easel. Those same files can be imported back into Genealogist from Psion .

The programme comes set up for a red screen with white lettering, but if you don't like that you are provided with a facility to change that to white on black or almost any other combination you can think of. You make your own colour combination choice for any window.

As I am also writing a lot stuff dealing with such things as movements, occupations, anecdotes, family histories and a whole lot of interesting, and some not so interesting facts, that kind of

stuff, I have GENEALOGIST and text* 1 plus* running together, this way I can quickly switch from one to the other as I progress. In fact it is possible to have two TREES going at the same time - but watch your memory!

Now to a neat little thing. As the programme starts, there is a little square clock that comes onto the middle of the screen, with real hands! and it keeps popping up as you change from one facility to another - just to remind you of the passage of time! Neat neat neat.

You don't want to keep a record of your family? Then use this programme to keep track of those cats and dogs and horses you breed, it can be used for just about any record of ancestry or breeding you wish .

Now where is this programme available? Why, from my old friend: -

DILWYN JONES COMPUTING 41 BRO EMRYS, TAL-Y-BONT, BANGOR GYNEDD, UNITED KINGDOM, LL57 3YT

The last price I have is from the December 1993 Price List but I would advise you to check first, I don't think the price has gone up in that time, but then the time between writing and publication is not always predictable.

Genealogist 3 (Pointer) £60.00 Disk only Genealogist 2 £30.00 Disk only

Genealogist 1 £19.50 Disk only

Genealogist Budget £12.00 MDV/Disk

But if you really are serious about this, I would recommend the version 3 (Pointer)

One final thing which I consider to be very important , what happens when you have a problem? Why you write to Chris Boutal and the answer is on your desk before you know it. Service is terrific. But then if you have a programme as terrific as this, then you would also expect the service to be terrific - and it is .

940910

XTender A ZXS1 Emulator For The PC

Rene Bruneau Aug/Sept 1994

The Old Days

I bought §y first TS1000 in the winter of 1984 for $33.95, A couple of months later, I picked up a Gladstone 64k raipack for about the same price. At the tine, I wanted to learn more about computers and prograaaing, but couldn't justify spending a bundle on an Apple clone. The IBM PC was available, but at a much higher cost. (Apple at this tine was well established in the home Market, while IBM targeted their machines for the business office). After a couple of weeks of writing and saving stall programs on the TS1000, I ambitiously typed in a big program. After some 4 hours of typing, 1 reached over to press the save key on the tapedeck, bumped the computer, and

after another 4 hours of typing I had saved ty first

big program.

Today and Totorrow

The rest as they say is history. 1 currently own about 7 working TSlOOOs and some 10 others that don't won or are missing the OLA. I have the Lar ken disk operating system, the JLQ video upgrade, designed and built serial, parallel, keyboard, and video interfaces, and collected various programmers, sound boards and other peripherals that were available for the TS1000. I also have a 2068 with the Lar tin DOS, and built the JLO SAFE system with the thought of converting it to run on a TS1000. At one time I had a QL, but let it go when ' realized that it wasn't cost effective to expand it fat the tine I was also buying a PC for work related activities). An I going to give my Timex-Sinclair stuff away? Not yet. 1 an still having too such fun playing with them !

xiMsi

Having said that, one of the programs that I have purchased for the PC is a 2X81 emulator program called XTender, written by Carlo Delhez of Holland. This emulator turns the PC into a Super ZX81. When you run the program, what you see on the screen looks like a ZX81, the keys you press react like a 7X31, However, in writing the emulator, Mr Delhez has been able to add additional functions and features.

Keyboard

Most of the keys on the PC keyboard are mapped onto the ZXS1 f including the cursor and numeric pad. The Esc key is Shift-! (Edit), the Backspace Key is Shift-0 (Delete), the 'Cursor Left' key is Shift-5, Alt-4 is $, etc. In addition, the keys are auto repeat, No more hammering the keyboard to generate that teng string of characters!

DOS

In the emulator, the 2X81 now has a Dist Operating System. In addition to the normal program LOAD and SAVE operations which create !.P' files, Basic, Code, Lines, Screen, and Variables files are also supported. The ZX81 DOS also emulates all of the MS-DOS features to allow you to create and remove directories, change to different directories or drives and save or delete files from the hard drive or disk drives. The Basic <B' and Variables 'V filetypes are compatible with ZXTERMSO ( Fred Nachbaur's HiRez Modem program! Prograi and

Variables Upload and Download routines.

The copy of Xtender that I have (Ver 1.10) didn't have a tape loading routine to transfer files from a ZX81 to the PC or a print driver routine but that lay have changed since I received my registered copy. With registration, however, I did receive 2 additional disks containing a total of 160 prograas for the ZXS1 and a third disk of 80 programs is now available.

Compatibility of the emulator is almost 100%. A few programs that use the ear/mic lines or the ZX81 external bus ( eprom programmers, sound generators, etc) not available on the PC won't work for obvious reasons.

Coral Basic interpreter

A bonus feature of XTender is the inclusion of a program called the ZXSI Coral Basic Interpreter (CBI) written by Mr Delhez. This program provides ,oy with a full screen editor and 43 new comands that provide features like automatic line numbering, block delete, conditional loop structures (DO, LOOP, EXIT, WHILE, UNTIL, IF and ELSE) that allow you to do structured programming, DATA, READ, and RESTORE for data manipulation, and machine code applications like DP0KE (double poke), DPEEK (double peek), USER and CALL. The program also provides enhancements to some of the old commands like LIST CLS, SCROLL, PLOT and INPUT, An added feature is the program* ability to print descriptive error messages.

If you have a PC or ar£ locking to move to that platform, XTender is an excellent program to have.

ORDERIN6

To order the program, send a money order or bank draft worth NLG £0 (Dutch Gilders - about $45 Canadian) to:

Carlo Delhez, Emmastraat 3, 4651 BV Steenbergen, Netherlands

A shareware disk is available at a nominal cost if you want to evaluate the program.

To Pir int or No "t "to Print

In the last newsletter, Mr Juergen made a comparison between QL and IBM PC screen dumps. In the letter he indicated that the IBM screen dump will sometime print garbage instead of what is shown on the screen. Quite true, but to understand what is going on, you have to know that the IBM is capable of handling the display file in two modes, Text and Graphics, and it is the printer, not the computer, that is at fault for printing the garbage. Lines drawn in a text screen are displayed using what is called the IBM Extended Graphics Set. Most printers these days will support the IBM graphic characters, however, factory settings for the printer usually default to a standard setting that provides ASCII, Italic, and International characters sets, hence the garbage that prints out if you do a screen print on an IBM PC. To get a 'true' text dump, you have to set the dip switches on the printer to print the IBM graphics set. Of course, if you have one of the older printers like the Smith Corona Fastext 80 or the Radio Shack DMP105 you're stuck with the garbage.

Z D D D D 1? D D D V D V D D D D D V D D D V D D V D D D D V D 1 ' D D D D D ? 3 V S a f e W a r t \ i n q Opt i o n s 3

3 3DBDDDDDVDDDDDDDVDDDDDDDDDDDBDVVD? 3 3 3 3 Warning type 3 ON 3 3

3 C D E D D D D D 1 1 D I) D D V D V D D D D D D V D D D D D E P I ! D D 4 3 3 313 HD Lev level format 3 133

3 33.3 President 3 3 3

3 333 General write protect 3 3 3 3 343 Check executable files 3 3 3 3 3K53 Boot sector viruses 3 i 3 3

3 363 Pr ot ec t HI? boot sector 3 i 3 3 3 373 Protect FD boob sector 3 3 3 3 383 Fx o t e c t e x e c u t a b 1 e files 3 3 3 3 &DADDDDDDDDDDD D V D D D DDDD D D D D D H D D DD> 3 3 Press 1-8 toggle ON /OFF 3 3 Pr ess : ESC : to Exit 3 3 l: ' r e s s AL T - U t; o u. n I o a d f r o m m e i a o r v 3 0? D D DDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD D D D D D D D D D D V D D D >

VSafe Warning Options

~~~

Warning type

ON

1

HD Low level format

/

Re si dent

o

G e m e r a .1 w r i t e p r o t ec t

4

C h e c k e x e c u t a b 1 e f lies

5

B o o t s e c tor v i r u s €* s

4

6

P r o t e c t H D b o o t s e c t o r

V

7

P r o t e c t F D b o o t s e c t o r

8

Pr o t ec t exec u t ab 1 e f i 1 es

Press 1 8 toggle ON /OFF P r e s s < E S C > to Exit

Press ALT U to unload from memory

SOUND FOR THE ZXB 1

R. Bruneau Sept 1994

This project is specifically for the ZXB1/TS1000, giving it the saie'sound capabilities as the 2068 and a joystick port. The circuit is quite old, being published in various magazines in the 1985/1986 period. The biggest problem using the AY-3-8912 with a ZXB1 is the lack of In and Out commands and the number of registers on the chip that have to be programed to generate the desired sounds. Earlier this year, I began to experiment with Fred Nauchbaur's SHREB (Static ran High Resolution Extended Basic) to see if I could todify a prograi written for the Spectrum (Ref. 1) that would simplify the programing of the sound chip. The results are approximately 600 bytes of code that reside in a REM statement that provides three new commands accessed by the BASIC Command:

IF USR MUSIC! THEN LPRINT Command; Parameters

1.

(previously defined: M[USIC] =16586)

PCLAY3jd,e,n,t

where d = duration e = envelope n = noise channel t = tone channel

0-6! 0-7 0-7 0-7

(fig 1)

PLAY enables the channels and defines the type of sound that MUSIC and SOUND will sake. There are 3 noise and 3 tone channels and 8 envelope shapes. The channels are activated as follows:

below iiddle C. If volute is set to zero, control of the output is passed to the envelope generator of PLAY.

S[0UND3;v,p,c where v = voluae p = pitch

c = channel

0-15

0- 65335

1- 6

SOUND siiply blasts a tone of the specific pitch through the specified channel. FLAY is used to select the envelope shape and duration.

Commands can be chained together, separated by a semi-colon. Error checking is done when the program is run. Errors P,M, and S will indicate paraieter errors in the respective PLAY, MUSIC and SOUND commands.

The AY-3-8912 also has one 1/0 port that can be accessed via register 14 and a machine code routine has been included at 17037 to use it. LET variable = USR 17037 will give the status of the 1/0 port.

As it stands, the machine code is NOT relocatable, but can be reassembled at any address required (for example, as an addition to SHREB). For those who have boards that use the AY-3-8910 or 8912, such as the ZQN X-81, it is a simple ■atter of changing the port addresses. This board uses Port 215 (D7h) to set the register and Port 223 (DFh) to tranfer the register data.

6ETTIW6 STARTED

Schematics, printed circuit board and placement drawings are shown on the following pages, To set up the software, start by typing in the following:

1 PRINT (80 zeros separated by plus signs)

2 REM

As a direct command type: POKE 16513,234

POKE 16509,0

Key in the Hex loader and machine code (Listing 1 & 25. When that is done, delete everything after Line 2 and enter the Demo program in Listing 3.

Any questions can be directed to

Rene Bruneau, 120 Salei Ave

0

000

no channels

Toronto, Ontario, Canada,

1

003

Channel A

•-i

i

010

Channel B

Ref 1. The Sound of Music

3

011

Channels A & B

John Ainslo

4

100

Channel C

11 COMPUTING Dec 1985/ Jan

5

101

Channel A & C

6

110

Channel B & C

AY-3-8912 PARTS LIST

7

ill

Channel A,B & C

CAPACITORS

HCUSICl;v,n

o,c

Cl 220p Ceramic

where v =

volume

0-15

C2 iOOp Ceramic

n =

note

1-12 (fig 2)

C3,4,5 O.lOOu Polyester

o ~

octave

0-6

C6 0.047u Polyester

c =

channel

1-3

C7,S 4.7uF/16v Electrolytic

C9 lOOuF/lbv Electrolytic

MUSIC must be used with PLAY. Octave 0 starts 2

RESISTORS

Rl,2 470P

R3

P4,5

R6

RV1

10K

IK

10R

10K Trim Pot

SEMICONDUCTORS

IC1,2 74LS02 ICS 74LS688 IC4 AY-3-8912 ICS LM386

MISCELLANEOUS

3.5mm Jack Socket, IDC 9-pin (male) socket, ZX81 Edge connector,

sockets for ICs (2-14 pin, 1-20 pin, 1-28 pin, 1-8 pin)

14 pin 20 pin 28 pin 8 pin

NW\N N

N

AW

ENVELOPE SHAPES

Figure 1. Envelope Shapes

NOTES

8 10 12

OCTAVE

REGISTER

FUNCTION

BIT

7

6

4

3

2

1

0

KU

Channel A - Tone Period

8 Bit Fine Tone A

Rl

4 Bit Course Tone A

K2

.Channel B - Tone Period

8 Bit Fine Tone B

R3

4 Bit Course Tone B

R4

Channel C - Tone Period

8 Bit Fine Tone C

K5

4 Bit Course Tone C

R6

Noise Period

5 Bit Control

R7

Channel Enable

I/O

Noise

Tone

C

B

A

C

B

A

R8

Channel A - Amplitude

Env

4 Bit Control

R9

Channel B - Aaplltude

Env

4 Bit Control

RIO

Channel C - Amplitude

Env

4 Bit Control

Rl 1

8 Bit Fine Control

R12

Envelope Period

8 Bit Course Control

R13

Envelope Shape

4 Bit Control

KU

I/O Port

8 Bit Parallel Port

PSC REGISTERS

Figure 2. Musical Scale

Figure 3. AY-3-8912 Registers

2BREM Mm CHINE CODE SPUED LINE i

3 REN LINE I CONTAINS 650 B-rTES 18 5 A US "MUSIC" 183 ;_ET M = 15585

;7*.

Figure 6. Music Demo

IN

IF U5P M THEN LPR INT P.; 0,8,

C0C

0 , 0

120 GOTO ;83 REM

!0LUME 0-15 PITCH 0-65335 CHANNEL 1-5 -05 IF USP N THEN LPRINT P. 0,0,

O , 1

£10 FOR P=l TO 500 STEP 10 ££0 IF USP M THEN LPRINT 5; 5,8* P , 1

£30 PAUSE 10

£4-0 IF USP M THEN LPRINT 5.5,4* P, 1

£50 PAUSE 10

£60 IF USP M THEN LPRINT 5,5,12 *P , 1 2""0 PAUSE 10 £50 NEXT P

280 IF USP M THEN LPRINT P.; 0,8, O , 0 £25

300

GOTO 1000

r ~ m fyf^r'fi^n .. .

1ATI0N 0-32757

1SH

ENUELOPE 0-7 NOISE CHANNEL 0-7 TONE CHANNEL 0-7

305 CLS

310 PRINT "INPUT ENUELOPE SHAPE 2 20 INPUT 5

325 IF E>8 THEN GOTO 1000 CIO PRINT "INPUT DURATION" 348 INPUT D

350 IF USP M THEN LPRINT 5.0,15

8 . i ; P ; D . E , Q , i

550 PRINT AT 10.2. "PRESS AN r KE . TO RE-ENTER" Z70 PAUSE 4E4

375 O , 1 350 3 SO 480

405 410

8,1 420 425 438 4 35 440

0,1 460 465 470 460

8 . 8

1000

1010

1020 0"

1030

1048 MO " 1050 P 3"

1060 1070

1880 1898

m

2010 5888 8081 3882

IF USR M THEN LPRINT 5,8,15 P . 8 , 8 . 8 . 1 CLS

GOTO SCO

REM £gggg=gsg=ISfeS

'J GLUME 0-15 NOTE 1-12 OCTfiUE 8-5 CHANNEL 1-3

CLS

IF USR M THEN LPRINT P.O. O ,

FOR 0=0 TO 5 PRINT 0 ; " ".; FOR N=l TO 12 PRINT N ; "

IF USR M THEN LPRINT M.3.N,

NEXT N PRINT NEXT 0

IF USR M THEN LPRINT P.O. 8,

CLS PRINT PRINT AT 6 . 5; " 1 .

PRINT AT 5 ,5, "2 .

PRINT AT 18,5; "3.

SOUND DEM PLAY DEMO MUSIC DE

PRINT AT £8,5 .; " PRESS 1,2, 0

IF INKEYSs"" THEN GOTO 1060 IF INKEV$="i" THEN GOTO 200 IF INKEY$="2" THEN GOTO 388 IF INKEY$ = "3" THE N GOTO 400 PRINT AT 20 ,5; •'\H2=&gE£&£=&S*)

GOTO 1858 PRINT USP 17037 PAUSE 18 GOTC 5O00

Figure 4. Hex Loader

Figure 5. Machine Code Data

1

PRINT 0+0+0+0+0+0+0+0+0+0+0

16514 -

7676F57EFE1R2S02

= 929

+8+S+0+0+S+S+G

15522 -

- CF13F1C9221540CD

= 993

2

REM ** ENTER 80 ZEROS UITH

16530 -

550FE5CDCD15E1C9

= 1135

PLUS SIGNS BETUEEN

15533 -

221640CD550FE5CD

= 359

3

REM ** POKE 16513.234 REM ** RUN HEX LOADER

15545 -

A70EE 1C9CD8E40CD

= 1223

4

15554 -

5440C9CD3R4SCDS4

= 1157

90

PRINT "READ OR URITE (R/U) "

15552 -

40C92R1S407EFE19

= 793

95

INPUT M$

lc57£? -

2S24FE762S02CF0D

= 710

100

CLS

15573 -

E 122 15400 1000009

= 547

110

PRINT "START ADDRESS"

15535 -

2A16407EFEDE2602

= 772

120

INPUT S

16594 -

CF11E5237E11C240

= 339

130

PRINT "FINISH ADDRESS"

16602 -

D5FEE120F3D111E4

= 1373

140

INPUT F

15610 -

40D5237E47237EFE

= 924

145

IF M$="R" THEN GOTO 400

16613 -

762Sb5rE1920F6 7S

= 1064

150

FOR N=S TO F STEP 8

15 625 -

FE32CA064 1FE3SCA

= 1039

160

LET T=0

15634 -

o 2 4 x F E j 5 L m E 4 J.C3

= 119 b

170

SCROLL

15542 -

D240CF0A23CDR540

= 9 6 1

130

PRINT N ; " - " ;

15 650 -

FE 152 5 72 A72002CS

= 329

190

INPUT A$

1 5 6 5 5

1 6 3 2 3 D 4 0 2 3 C D A 5 4 0

= 5 5 7

200

PRINT A$ ; " = " ; INPUT TOT

1 5 6 5 6 -

(-E0D3062R72S5FD6

= 22;=i

210

i 6 6 7 4 -

0187E52 175420600

= 557

220

PRINT TOT

1 b 6 3 2 -

4F027E234S4FED43

= 702

230

LET 2=0

1 5 6 S O -

3F40E123CDA640FE

= 1076

240

FOR K=l TO LEN A$ STEP 2

16 695 -

0730433CED4E4040

= 522

250

LET C= iCQDE AS (K) -28) *16 + C0

15705 -

473A3F401307CE19

= 515

DE A$ (K + l) -28

15714 -

C5B2C51FA710F732

= 1102

270

LET T=T+C

15722 -

3 F 4 0 7 9 3 2 4 1 4 0 2 3 C D

= 657

230

POKE N + 2.. C

15730 -

8E40FE043020A72S

= 751

290

LET 2=2+1

167 3 3 -

1DF5C607323C40F1

= 594

300

NEXT K

15745 -

D50137323E403C32

- 6 35

310

IF' TOT =T THEN GOTO 348

15754 -

4040E50503213C4G

= 523

320

SCROLL

15762 -

C D 6 fi 4 2 C 3 B 4 4 0 C F 1 5

= 1044

330

PRINT "ERROR - PLEASE INPUT

15770 -

23CDA640FE 103036

= 342

AGAIN"

15775 -

A 7 2 0 O 2 C 6 1 0 3 2 3 D 4 0

= 59©

34S

GOTO 190

15736 -

2 3 C D A D 4 0 7 9 3 2 3 F 4 0

= 775

350

NEXT N