i-4

i 1

; 1

t I

MAR -APR '93 VOL 11-2

S INC -LINK IS A PUBLICATION OF THE TORONTO TIME! -SINCLAIR USERS CLUB AND IS ISSUED 6 TIMES A rEAR. CLUB MEMBERS RECEIVE FREE COPIES AS PART OF THE $20.00 ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP FEE.

NEWSLETTERS ARE EXCHANGED. FREE OF CHARGE, WITH OTHER TIMEX- SINCLAIR USER GROUPS.

PLEASE CREDIT THIS PUBLICATION AND THE AUTHOR IF YOU MATERIAL.

COPY

THE TS2068 & ZX-81 GROUP MEETS ON THE FIRST HEDNESDAY OF EACH MONTH AT 14 RICHOME COURT, SCARBOROUGH, ONT. 7PM START.

THE QL SIG WILL MEET WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17TH AT 586 ONEIDA DRIVE, BURLINGTON, ONT. 7PM START. APRIL DATE TBA.

SINC-LINK IS ON SINCLAIR COMPUTERS.

PRODUCED ENTIRELY AND TIMEX-SINCLAIR

SEND CORRESPONDANCE TO t

Attention t SINC-LINK TORONTO TIMEX- SINCLAIR CLUB, 14 RICHOME

SCARBOROUGH, ONTARIO, CANADA MIX 2Y1.

EXECUTIVE OmCEHS:

PRESIDENT; TREASURER SECRETARY i ACTIVITIES QL CONTACT; NBHSLETTERi LIAISON OFFICER: ( Out-of-toim Bfimiders

EDITOR USERS COURT,

TORONTO TIHEX-SIMCLfllR

( Area Code 416 ) RENE BRUNEAU ( 531-9749 ) BIIiL LAWSON ( 444-6772 ) GEORGE CHAMBERS ( 751-7559 ) LOU LAFERRIERE ( 820-3725 ) HUGH HOKIE ( 634-4929 ) JEFF TAYLOR ( 244-8583 ) GEORGE CHAMBERS, 14 RIOKDME COURT. SCARBOROUGH, ONTARIO MIK 2Y1 ( 416- 751-7559 )

USERS CLUB

TORONTO TIHEX-SINCLAIR USERS CLUB

SPRING AHEAD 1993

INDEX VOLUME 11-2

Page 2 - Club Stuff Page 3 - This Page Page 4 - Editorial Page 5 - Interbank Database - Part 2 (2068) Page 8 - Sine-Link Comes Through Again Page 9 - SLOWGOLD to Slow Gold (QL) Page 10 - Notes on QL Lock-ups (QL) Page 11 - Did You Know? (2068) Page 17 - Printing Databases (QL) Page 19 - Tasman "B" I/F & Larken System (2068) Page 21 - ZX Resources - RS-232 I/O (ZX-81 & 2068) Page 24 - Text87 and Wordstar (QL) Page 27 - QUANTA Index (QL) Page 28 - Copying a SCREEN$ to the 2040 (2068)

Page 29 - QL SIG (QL) Page 30 - QLips (QL) Page 31 - Prism PD Advertisement (Spectrum & 2068)

SINC-LINK

Editorial

Well, I'm a little late getting this issue out and I apologize to those readers who have been getting a bit anxious. I do have a few good reasons for the delay though. Sometimes an editor knows an article is coming from one of his writers but that writer is just having a tough time smoothing the rough edges so the editor gives his man some leeway, knowing it will be worth the wait. And sometimes an editor hears of some late-breaking news and just wants to get his facts straight before he prints anything. Both are the case in this issue and since my deadline can slip a bit I felt I could justify waiting for these juicy items. I think you'll agree.

QL Fest in Rhode Island!

Just when you thought there would never be another Timex-Sinclair computerf est , the good folks on the East coast have announced that there wi 1 1 be a QL Users Fest in Newport, Rhode Island, Saturday June 5th 1993, from 1 pm to 5 pm. Venue to be announced. Already a few of our in-town members have expressed an interest in attending and possibly manning a Toronto club table. More details in the May-June issue of Sine-Link. Now, if we could only convince the organizers to make it a full T-S meeting. I can think of a few ZX-81'rs and 2068 'rs who would be interested . . .

Sine-Link Gets UK Exposure

Thanks to Hugh Howie's mailing drive (see editorial last issue) and out-of-town member Robert Shade's efforts, Sine-Link has gotten noticeable mentions in recent issues of prestigious UK publications such as QL World, Quanta and Sinclair User. We've already had inquiries from a couple of public domain software vendors, namely I>r. Dark and Prism PD (see Prism's advert in this issue) . Thanks to Hugh and Robert for promoting our newsletter and our club.

lan's Back in the Fold!

I'm pleased to welcome long-time member and former article contributor, Ian Robertson, back to these pages. After an illness and very time-consuming work load, Ian is writing for us again and promises to keep at it. Another one for me to chase as the deadline approaches. Welcome back, Ian.

God Rest You, Jessie

On February 23rd 1993, Hugh Howie's dear wife, Jessie, passed away suddenly, a month before her 66th birthday. A nurse and midwife by profession, mother of three, grandmother, wife and homemaker, this charming, hospitable and inexhaustible woman will be missed by all. Hugh, our deepest sympathies.

J.T.

SINC-LINK

INTERBANK DATABASE - Part 2

TS-2068 and the Larken RAMdisk George Chambers

This is the second of two articles describing the insertion of blocks of prepared data into an interbank database.

The first article descr i bed how the data was massaged into Tasword flies prior to being placed into the database. This article will describe the steps involved in actually moving it into the database, i.e. into the Ramdisk banks.

There are three distinct steps to this. First step is to finish massag ing the Tasword files. Second step, insert ing these Tasword files into the computer and RAMdisk banks. And thirdly, entering values into the INTERBANK program code to delineate the parameters of the database, i.e. length of each record, number of records, and number of databanks invol ved.

A Tasword file is not large enough to hold a complete bank of data. That is to say, a bank can hold 32766 bytes while a Tasword file can hold only 19200 characters. I decided to make up Tasword files of 256 lines (each line contains 6^ characters). This gives us 163814- bytes, exactly half of the bank size of 32768 bytes. A very conven lent size.

The reason for keeping the records in chronological order, from the beginning of the process is easy to explain. It is because of a serious flaw in the Interbank Database SORT feature code; every time a SORT is done a number of files become corrupted. A flaw that we have to work around, since the m/c programming involved is beyond my capabilities to lorrect.

There is really no need to sort this database, since it's only natural

order is chrono log ica 1 . So the cheap and dirty solution is to ensure the

database is installed initially in it's correct chronological order. And refrain from using the SORT function thereafter!

To get back to the task. Initially the Tasword files were of different sfzes.^ It was necessary to create a series of Tasword files each exactly 256 lines in size. This was done by merging files and line deletion. Each file created by this means was saved off as "fileOV, ''file02'', etc., in chronolog ical order, each file being exactly 256 lines (1638^^ bytes).

Now that the Tasword files described above have been created and saved, it was time to combine pairs of thes files to make blocks of code 32768 bytes in length, i.e. a bank of code conta in ing 256 records.

I started off by loading the first file, the ''f i leOI .CT" from disk directly into an empty computer by the instruct ion: RANDOMIZE USR 100: LOAD "fileOI.CT" OODE 32768

Next I loaded the second file, ''file02.CT", with the instruct ion: RANDOMIZE USR 100: LOAD "file02.CT" CODE ^9152

Now the computer is filled with the first bank of data. This was saved back to disk with the instruct ion:

RANDOMIZE USR 100: SAVE "bankOO.CI " CODE 32768,32768.

Shut the computer off momentar i ly, to clear the memory. I then loaded he next two chrono log ica 1 files into the computer using the same process us above; saved this to disk the same way, using the filename i'pankOI CI"

SINC-LINK

The same process was used for the third bank of data. We now have three files, each containing 32768 bytes of data. Well, l^^'t file, although

we saved off 32768 bytes, was only partially filled with data. No matter.

I now have to create a new database shell to hold and manage these files. I loaded an existing database file, and selected the ''NEW DATABASE" option. It asked for a new file name and the record length of the new file. I entered "SINCLI" and 128 bytes. The program then returned to the menu. I selected the option L)ist, and asked that it start listing at item 1. It proceeded to list records. Of course they were empty, but no matter. I am in the computer memory. When the "scroll?" prompt appears I enter "N". A "PRESS ANY KEY" prompt appears. I BREAK into the Basic program. I then proceed to load the first datafile prepared and saved earlier, "bankOO.CI ".

At this point we have the first block of data, "bankOO.CI " , entered into the database. Enter GOTO 1, to re-enter the database. Select option L)ist, and start the listing at record 250. The records 250 to 256 contain SINC'-LINK files. Record 257 and beyond contain rubbish. Actually, what has happened is that the first bank of the RAMdisk has been bankswitched, and you are viewing it.

Remember I said I had saved off the RAMdisk beforehand . Here's the reason. We are going to write the next block of our new SINCLINK file over this RAMdisk bank right now.

When the "scroll?" appears, enter "N" , and then Break into Basic, as before. You must do this when you are viewing records between 256 and 511, because we want to load the second file, "bankOI .01 " , into the first RAMdisk bank. We know records 256 to 511 are held in the first Ramdisk bank and also that when we are viewing them the RAMdisk bank has been sw itched, ( interchanged ) with the computer memory above address 32768. Did I lose you there!

I said I broke into Basic. I now load the second SINCLINK file, "bankOI .CI " , into the computer. After this, I enter GOTO 1, to get into the database program. Doing this automat ical ly restores the RAMdisk bank to it's original status. Selecting option L)ist, I can then choose to start the listing at record 1, or 256, or 500, for example. All these will bring up SINCLINK files. However if I List 500 I will presently move along to record 512.^ At this point the second bank of RAMdisk will be banksw itched into the computer memory. When a "scroll?" prompt appears after record 512, break out of the program the same way as descr i bed previously, and proceed to load the last SINCLINK file "bank02" into the computer.

It is possible to do the banksw itch ing by using the OUT command. For example, one could switch the first RAMdisk bank in with the instruct ion OUT 21^4,240: OUT 7,71; and switch it out with OUT 2i4i^,0: OUT 7,0. However the approach used in this article seems to be somewhat simpler.

Re^-enter the database program with a GOTO 1, and List starting at say, record 600. We are looking for the number of the last record in the file. When I come across it I shall write it down.

Since the database does not know how many records we have installed, I have to let it know. I do this by poking a number into the "SHELL. Co" program code. S im i lar ly, the database does not know how many banks are involved, and we have to poke that info in also. The addresses for the POKES are:

SINC-LINK

-32766/67 The total number of records in the file, -32765 The number of banks used by the file, -32760 The length of each record,

M^f!'^*^'^® number of records exceeds 256 two addresses are reauired fn

Too- POKeT27Z- 'r:'' ^ouble-POKE feature: Enter^^NDOMIZE u^l°

belTmel°Z1,ll''i JlJ'^^^'^''^'' °"' ^''^^'^ RAMdisk bank

zi: zTZeTt/Ve v^ii^ TnViTy- ^f^aJ^^TV^r

thlT rlZVn?tn°'JT ^^'y^'i^'^^ '"^^^ ^c,s been con,pleted. Now all

^naz remains to be done /s to save the database to disk Selt^rt -th^ n ). :* opt, on, and indicate which drive is to receive the data. ^'^"'^

S INC -LINK

Sine-Link comes through again - Plea for BIG EMS nterts with some success.

But we are STILL LOOKING for BIG EARS.

It is nice to know that when Sine-Link asks for aid in a worthy cause, we are able to reach someone who can help. In the Nov/Dec issue of Sine-Link a plea was printed from Jeff Dodds of Edinburgh asking for assistance in locating BIG EARS, for a project he was working on to aid the dis-abled. Here is what he now has to say.

H . H H

H. Howie Oneida Dr Burlington Ontario Canada

J. R. Dodds

87/53 Pennywell Gdns Edinburgh

EH4 4TF

Scotland

22 1 93

Dear Hugh

Sorry to take so long over writing to you but I've been in and out of hospital so much since I came back from Canada, I haven't had time to get near my word processor. So here goes.

Since you published my appeal in your magazine I have received offers of help from California and from, I think, Indiana IN? Donald Lambert the chairman of the latter group has promised to run the letter you published in his next newsletter but says they only publish quarterly so it may take some time.

As to my own work, I have a friend here who has several ZXSl's as well as eprom programmers, so see no difficulties in programming a ZX81 motherboard. I intend that the motherboard drives an LCD display as well as steppermotors . The LCD display will show a question and wait for an input, which will take the form of Yes, No and Stop. Stop, the most important input, will put the board back to standby comHtion, uTiilst Start will wake it from that state. Yes would immediately implement the question asked and return to that same position for further input, while No would progress to the next question.

Stepper motors require a maximum of 200 herz to drive them, and 48 steps per revolution, so if I restrict each Yes input to a maximum of 48 steps I shall get one revolution of the motor. If I further reduce the drive by a fifty-to-one worm drive I will now get a seven degree movement of the arm at any motor. Not much, but enough for most purposes, and certainly enough to prevent damage. As you can see the speed will be about 1/4 second for 7 degrees of movement, or about 8 seconds for 180 degrees, so it is not fast. But then, the people using it are not likely to be in a hurry either.

Warmest greetings to your fellow members and may the New Year bring all you wish yourselves.

Yours Faithfully (signed)

J. R. Dodds.

8

SINC-LINK

SLOWGOLD TO SLOW GOLD

A long long time ago when your daddy was a little boy, there was a young prince in the land, who thought he had found the answer to all his peoples problems, and he called it the QL. He had great hopes that this would make all the people in the kingdom happy, and himself rich, and get him great honours in the land.

He got himself rich. He got himself great honours. But he did not make all in the land happy, * cause it was not long till the people in the land discovered the QL was not fast enough, so we had Lightning, Speedscreen, Minerva, and a host of other things foisted on us. *till along came the ultimate - The GOLD CARD!

Now we had everything - Speed plus Memory and the ability to use large capacity disks. But like all things we ask for, we sometimes get more than we bargooned for, and this is what happened with the Gold Card; it was much too fast for so many of our Games. Graphics and the Pointer Environment also suffered We now wanted to go slow. In the Gold Card there was a little facility called SLUG which did help a little, but still not enough .

One thing I found, and let me state here that this in no way affects the operation of the program, I relate this experience to see if anyone can come up with an answer. I am not the only one who would like to know what happens in the program.

When I first got SLOWGOLD, I of course had to do some timing tests on it, and as I have a little graphic drawing program which takes about 9 seconds on the Gold Card to complete, I inserted a little timing facility into this program and ran it at different speeds of SLOWNESS, and came up with some interesting figures.

SLOWGOLD is supposed to have 31 degrees of slowness. Starting at 0 (No Slow) which took 9 seconds, I then went all the way one step at a time to 31, and in the process I found that the slowness peaked at 266 seconds at 15. At 16 was almost at the beginning again, and peaked again with 269 seconds at 31.

Now if it jumped from 9 seconds to 266 seconds in 15 steps, I think that is enough variety for anyone to need. With that I don ' t need the other degrees of slowness.

Along comes Norman Dunbar and Dilwyn Jones with SLOWGOLD. This little program which costs so little in price is really big in what it can do. Not only does it slow the Gold Card down, but it can slow down any QL. (if you wanted to)

The Painter was a program that was much too fast when used with the Gold Card, and when I tried SLOWGOLD, then Painter slowed down to usable speed.

With SLOWGOLD, there is a little program supplied which you may use to tell you whether SLOWGOLD is ON or OFF.

There is a PANEL facility so that you can use the supplied, &/or designate your own Hotkeys, to change the rate of slowness from within a program.

The SLOWGOLD manual is in the form of a _doc file on the disk, and when printed out is just over seven pages of really good easy to follow advice and instruuctions. Even I could follow it.

I have not taken timings other than for that graphics program, and I don't intend to. The rate of slow-ness I get from SLOWGOLD is good enough for me.

However, I wrote to Dilwyn Jones about this and he does not know how this occurs, and would like to know WHY just as much as I would. Any answers out there?

I got mine from EMSoft, Box 8763, Boston, MA 02114-0037. Phone (617) 889 0830. I don*t know if Peter has any left at this time.

If not, you could send £5 plus £1 postage, to:- Dilwyn Jones Computing, 41 BRO EMRYS, TAL-Y-Bont, Bangor, Gynedd, United Kingdom. LL57 3YT.

You also could soon be the owner of this wonderful SLOWGOLD for the GOLD CARD.

930219

SINC-LINK

9

NOTES ON QL LOCK-UPS

by Hngh Howie

A while back someone mentioned that I appeared to be reasonably immune to QL crashes and lock-ups etc., and this made me stop and do a little bit thinking, which thoughts might be worth passing on to the rest of the intelligentsia out there.

It is true that I have had less problems than most in this respect. But I am not immune, I have had my fair share of them, but the fault does not necessarily lie with the QL.

When I took my equipment to a school to give a club demo, to be sure the QL would do weird and wonderful things. Between the smoke of frustration and the steam of boiler corks popping, the air was quite often a rich blue in color. When I got the QL back home everything was just fine and dandy. No problems except for getting it all connected up again.

I took notice of what went on at that school, and noticed that there were always, at least very frequently, some high powered floor polishers in operation. My thought was Power Surges, which I have not experienced much at home. Any problems I have had have mainly been of the odd chip sort of getting loose in the socket and having to be pressed back in again. Or a membrane having to be replaced.

out in the country, and he does not have Hydro. -He has his own Solar System, which can be backed up by diesel. But during the three days I was there, we haa as many as three QL's networked, and they were all going at the the same time, and we did not have one single crash. That also meant three monitors and disk drives, and printers, and everybody trying to do something at the same time, and messages and programs flashing back and forth on the net. And in spite of all those different things and different operators, we did not have one single crash for any reason! And we were working from a Solar System, WITHOUT the diesel back-up being required.

As this was a monthly meeting of NESQLUG a number of members brought their own QL's, resulting in a good cross reference of many users and units, and many configurations, such as Minerva, Gold & Trump cards etc. As I say, there was not one malfunction that I can recall.

I also use Micro-Drive successfully, my main problem is usually a faulty cart- ridge failing on me, not the QL. Incidentally while I am on about those pesky micro -drives; did you know that one very very common cause of failure is an attempt to OVER-WRITE on them. That is correct, you should always re-format a cartridge before putting anything on it.

Those who have been experienced crashing problems would seem to be living in apartments, or town houses, where there may be many types of equipment in use and possibly connected to the same source. I know of one person who has four QL's and is only now starting to have some success with one of them. Power Surges?

OH Yes! I still get the odd crash, but it is usually because I have done something wrong with the software, like punching the wrong keys and the poor old QL just gives up in disgust and says if you are going to speak to me like that then I am going to bed. And it proceeds to do so. Big problem is that I don't think like a computer.

When I made a trip to New Hampshire last year, I visited Bill Cable who is away

Seems to be that it is possible to fragment a program and also a sector, and actually have segments of two programs on the same sector! So beware - format a micro-drive cartridge before a save, or even a re-save to a cartridge. Don't ask me how this occurs as I don*t know.

Never over- write a cartridge.

Those who have solved the crash problem most successfully would appear to have had the Adam Coleco conversion done by Dan Elliott of Cabool. I understand this cures a lot of those surge ills. No I have not had it done myself, as I don't think I need it from the number of crashes I do have. But I still keep this conversion in mind - just in case

930103

SINC-LINK

DXD I have enjoyed the quality of our newsletter and

YOU I have been awed by the knowledge of some of our

KlsTOW contributors. I guess that I have assumed that ? everyone else has all the information that I have

available to me. Our last newsletter and the out of town letter from George reminded me what assuming does. The request for information about the code for our DOS and the comment that a schematic is unavailable triggered me. Ken Schoenberger has written a good disassembler and he printed out the code and added remarks as he analysized it. It is 38 pages long with two columns per page. Rather that print out a copy to send in (I have nearly worn mine out and Ken's comments would be lost) I have started to key it in to MScript so that it can be printed out at 15 CPI with narrow spacing. My Christmas present was a Canon Bubble Jet Printer and it seems readable at this smaller type. It is labor intensive so this installment will cover the first third of the code* The code in the "forbidden area" was given to us and I have not verified it, I hope to do this before the last installment and I will report back later.

The second item, the cartridge and I/F schematic, was something I was curious about when I first got my Larken system. I had looked over the cartridge and had started to put it on paper. To verify that I had it right I built a unit on a discarded Zebra board. After one false start with one wiring error it worked.

So the cartridge schematic should be correct. I did not recognize the marking on one diode, so I merely recorded what was on it. I used a diode that looked like it and it worked.

I do have to apologize for not using a Timex to do the schematic, but I thought it would be clearer done on a Laser printer ,

I have not done anything on the disk I/F. If anyone is seriously interested in the schematic for it I could work on it after I complete the disassembly of the cartridge.

If any one knows of a m/c patch that would allow me to send the disassembly to memory instead of screen or printer, I would be interested in trying that rather than retyping the remaining pages .

My typing skills are far from perfect, so in case anyone is interested in verifying a particular piece of code here is how it was done:

1. Clear 39999

2. Load in TSDB at 60000

3. Key in a short basic routine to do a LKdos peek and poke to 40000 + address

4. Set offset so that proper addresses show in print out (send disassembly to screen or)

5. Set margin for left column

6. set printer on in TSDB

7. disassemble until page is full

8. reset margin to print right column

9. disassemble until page is full

10. repeat 5 thru 9 for next page

Les Cottrell 108 River Heights Drive Cocoa, FL 32922-6630

SINC-LINK

Larken Cartridge Schematic

if) s

o o

Q CC

^ Q.

-I U

3

<

<

< <

^ ^ ^ V> < < < O

o ^ w

< < <

<

O r- O O

fM <0 f

o o 5

in <o N O O O

S <

si

«

<

CM

a

1^

3

S

8

8

y

U7

o o

HI"

E o

h_

Q.

O

<A

o

c

(0

^ m

0 O CO ^ f;j

1 i ^ i >

S X

O Csl

« CD CO

CO CO

_i _i

CM

CM

< ^ 2!

CM 13 r-

CJ CM a> ,

^ -2

^ O ^ ^ Z g g

in 1- 1- ^ CM fa £

I I I O

lO CD 00 T- T- ~

QC GC QC QC O O a

S C5

o

>

o

uT

LL

LL

a

CJ

CM

o

o

CO

o

CO

*

00

CM

«

1

t

1

t

1

1

1

O

CM

CO

CM

CO

o

£

CC

CC

\\\\

c < <

CC

< <

< < <

e ^ ?! 12 tt < < < 5

o

DC

O T- Oi r> O r-

< < < < o o

s s

SINC-LINK

LARKKN CARTRIDGE DISASSEMBLY

name

Dec

Hex

Instr-Dec

Remarks ( 1 )

name

Dec

Hex

0000

0000

DI

TRACK

0126

007E

0001

0001

JP 752

NEXTTR

0129

0081

0004

0004

LD C, H

INDR

0132

0084

0005

0005

NOP

MOVDR

0135

0087

0006

0006

NOP

CMDCK

0138

008A

0007

0007

NOP

ENDLN

0141

008D

RST 8

0008

0008

NOP

EVALU

0144

0090

0009

0009

JP 210

NOFIL

0147

0093

0012

oooc

NOP

WPROT

0150

0096

0013

OOOD

NOP

ZERO

0153

0099

0014

OOOE

NOP

GTFIL

0156

009C

0015

OOOF

NOP

ROMM

0159

009F

RST 16

0016

0010

LD DE, 16

NEWET

0162

00A2

0019

0013

LD (8192), DE

DECDP

0165

00A5

0023

0017

LD DE, 98

TRANOK

0168

00A8

0026

OOIA

PUSH DE

DOScp

0171

OOAB

0027

OOIB

JR 37

DOSER

0174

OOAE

0029

OOID

NOP

CLRBF

0177

OOBl

0030

OOIE

NOP

ENCOD

0180

00B4

0031

OOIF

NOP

VSERCH

0183

00B7

RST 32

0032

0020

LD DE, 32

J POUT

0186

OOBA

0035

0023

JR 19

GROW

0189

OOBD

0037

0025

LD DE, (8192)

SHRNK

0192

OOCO

0041

0029

PUSH DE

OTERR

0195

00C3

0042

002A

JR 65

; gtout

LD#1

0198

00C6

0044

002C

NOP

LD#2

0201

00C9

0045

002D

NOP

SV#1

0204

OOGC

0046

002E

NOP

SV#2

0207

OOCF

0047

002F

NOP

0210

00D2

RST 48

0048

0030

JP 252

0213

00D5

0051

0033

NOP

0216

00D8

0052

0034

NOP

0219

OODB

0053

0035

NOP

0221

OODD

0054

0036

NOP

0222

OODE

0055

0037

NOP

0223

OODF

0056

0038

RET

0226

00E2

0057

0039

PUSH AF

j

0229

00E5

0058

003A

LD A, (110)

0230

00E6

0061

003D

POP AF

0231

00E7

0062

003E

EI

0234

OOEA

0063

003F

SCF

0235

OOEB

0064

0040

RET

0238

OOEE

GTOUT

0065

0041

PUSH HL

0239

OOEF

0066

0042

PUSH DE

0242

00F2

0067

0043

PUSH BC

0244

00F4

0068

0044

LD HL, 57

0246

00F6

0071

0047

LD DE, 23700

0249

00F9

0074

004A

LD BC, 10

48

0252

OOFC

0077

004D

LDIR

0253

OOFD

0079

004F

POP BC

0254

OOFE

0080

0050

POP DE

0255

OOFF

0081

0051

POP HL

0257

0101

0082

0052

JP 23700

0260

0104

0085

0055

LD A, (110)

0262

0106

0088

0058

EI

0265

0109

0089

0059

RST 8ERR 1

0267

OlOB

0091

005B

NOP

0269

OlOD

0092

005C

NOP

0271

OlOF

0093

005D

NOP

0274

0112

0094

005E

NOP

0276

0114

0095

005F

NOP

0279

0117

f ,

0096

0060

NOP

0281

0119

o

0097

0061

NOP

0284

one

r

0098

0062

DI

0285

OllD

b

0099

0063

RET

0287

OllF

i

0100

0064

DI

0289

0121

d

0101

0065

RST 48

0292

0124

d

0102

0066

NOP

0293

0125

e

0103

0067

RST 48

0294

0126

n

0104

0068

NOP

0298

012A

0105

0069

RST 48

0301

012D

0106

006A

DI

0303

012F

0107

006B

RST 48

0305

0131

a

0108

006C

DI

0306

0132

r

0109

006D

RST 48

0307

0133

e

0110

006E

DI

0308

0134

0111

006F

XOR A

0309

0135

0112

0070

LD HL, (8200)

; lenth

0310

0136

0115

0073

LD C, (HL)

0311

0137

0116

0074

LD B. A

0312

0138

0117

0075

JR 65

0313

0139

0119

0077

NOP

0314

013A

SAVEBF

0120

0078

JP 3651

;Save buffer

to disk

0318

013E

LOADBF

0123

007B

JP 1084

;Load buffer

from disk

0320

0140

Instr-Dec Remarks

TP "^S?!

*R*afil"OT*^ t^o Tr"Wfl t"h*^n ^^^If

TP "^^07

TP 2307

* Ck dir fof file fin Dsm)

IP 2392

'Move cell to diwka

TP 2208

Chf»ck command svntax

TP 1013

Move CHADD to end basic

TP 1026

\ V -X. VX VX. \m \-m X A VXXXX^^ X> ^ Km X- X. Kijl \m J. C«X

TP 7127

No "flip P*r'T"oi*

TP 2444

' nh^pk" For* nr'ot'Pft' <;t""i f*tf>r"

f tTS V>*XV JL \J X ^ X WWw^i' k3 L- X l^l^Cl.

TP 271 1 '

X\ KZ- O Km KJ X K^ w JL XN. w U 0 G U \J J J. JL

TP 21 Sfi

» TCxfSk 1 Q t" T"! tip* nil t* in noiii

TP 1046 "

Ch^rk for Sn^^r truin ROM

uXfC>^'V XwX O^^^L*X UlU X\ wX X

TP 2404

Pill" n@w trv in dir

I X U C> ftX^w ^^XAL»X jr ^XX LXJUX

JP 1781 \

, Print tempi in decimal

TP 3110 -

. Final routine for save

JP 1183

Close disk channel

TP 1822 '

TP 1191

TP Ills "

TP 7f\'\^

TP AS

JP 1763 ;

Insert space in program

JP 1746 ;

, Delete space in program

JP 2320 ;

Cat data error

JP 1254 ;

First half of User Id cmd

JP 1635 ;

second half

JP 2503 ;

First half User save comd

JP 2578 ;

second half

LD HL, 85

LD DE, 23700 ; membot + 2

LD BC, 10

LDIR

POP HL

LD A, (HL) ; (95)=0

LD (23705), A ; error it

JP 23700

POP AF

POP HL

LD HL, 229

PUSH HL

LD HL, 118

PUSH HL

LD HL 8064

BIT 7, A

JR Z, 249

LD HL, 3224

JP 65

; gtout

EX (SP),

HL

PUSH AF

LD A, L

CP 102

; f

JP Z, 920

CP 104

; h

JP Z, 279

CP 106

; j

JR Z, 229

CP 108

; 1

JP Z, 4405

CP 110

JP Z, 1070

LD A, I

JP PE, 287

XOR A

JR 289

LD A, 255

LD (22527) , A

POP AF

POP HL

LD (22525), SP

LD SP, 22521

PUSH lY

PUSH IX

PUSH HL

PUSH DE

PUSH BC

PUSH AF

EXX

PUSH HL

PUSH DE

PUSH BC

PUSH AF

LD (22523), SP

LD A, I

LD (22522), A

SINC-LINK

name

MUSIC

DELAY

Dec

Hex

Instr-Dec

0323

0143

LD SP, 15000

0326

0146

LD A, 1

0328

0148

LD (8194), A

0331

014B

CALL 348

0334

014E

IN A, 31

0336

0150

CALL 505

0339

0153

CALL 547

03A2

0156

CALL 348

0345

0159

JP 415

0348

015C

LD A, 7

0350

015E

OUT 245, A

0352

0160

LD A, 56

0354

0162

OUT 246, A

0356

0164

LD A, 8

0358

0166

OUT 245, A

0360

0168

LD A, 15

0362

016A

OUT 246, A

0364

016C

LD BC, 209

0367

016F

CALL 390

0370

0172