SEPT - OCT 3 1 VOL. 9 NO. 5

TALL AGAIN ISSUE

page 2 Club Stuff

page 3 Editorial & A Few Thoughts

page 4,5 Bob's Notebook - Toolkit Pact 3 (2068)

page 6-10 Printer Interfaces £ Driver Software (2068)

page 10 Mystery Program (ZX81/TS1000 )

page 11 TorQLib - QL Library (QL)

page 12,13 Dayton Computer f est 1991

page 14-16 LKDOS User-Defined Commands (2068)

page 16 Scroll Clear (ZX81/TS1000)

page 17 New PRINT FACTORY Graphics (2068)

page 18,19 GOLD CARD Review (QL)

page 20,21 Bob's Notebook - Toolkit Part 4 (2068) page 22 Ramblings

page 23-25 Bob's Notebook - Autoboot s Grafix24 (2068)

page 25 Faster Slow Node ( ZX81/TS1000 )

page 26 One Sided Disks Do Not Exist

page 27 Digital Clock Program (2068)

page 28,29 Advertisements

page 30 Overseas Letter (QL)

TORONTO TIMEX-SINCLAIR USERS CLUB

SINC

SINC-L INK IS A PUBLICATION OF THE TORONTO TIMEX-SINCLAIR USERS CLUB AND IS ISSUED 6 TIMES A YEAR. COPIES OF THE NEWSLETTER ARE $1.50 EACH FOR NON-MEMBERS. CLUB MEMBERS RECEIVE FREE COPIES AS PART OF THE $20. 00 ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP FEE. A NEWSLETTER SUBSCRIPTION ONLY IS AVAILABLE FOR $12. 00.

NEWSLETTERS ARE EXCHANGED, FREE OF CHARGE, WITH OTHER

TIMEX-SINCLAIR USERS GROUPS.

PLEASE CREDIT THIS PUBLICATION AND THE AUTHOR IF vqu COPY MATERIAL.

THE CLUB MEETS ON THE FIRST WEDNESDAY OF EACH MONTH AT FOREST HILLS COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE, 7 JO EGLINTON AVE. W. , TORONTO.

SINC-L INK IS PRODUCED ENTIRELY ON SINCLAIR AND TIMEX-SINCLAIR COMPUTERS.

SEND CCRRESPONDANCE TO:

Attention: SINC-L INK EDITOR TORONTO TIMEX-SINCLAIR USERS CLUB, 14 RICHOME COURT,

SCARBOROUGH , ON TAR I O , CANADA M1K 2Y1

LINK

SEPT - OCT '3 1

VOL.9 NO. 5

TORONTO TIttEX-SINCLftIR USERS CLUB

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS :

PRESIDENT TREASURER SECRETARY ACTIVITIES: TAPE LIBRARIAN ZX81 : TAPE/DISK LIBRARIAN QL : PAPER LIBRARIAN: NEWSLETTER: LIAISON OFFICER: ( Out-of-town members )

(Area Code 416) RENE BRUNEAU ( 531-9749 ) BILL LAWSON ( 444-8772 ) GEORGE CHAMBERS ( 751-7559 ) RENE BRUNEAU ( 531-9749 ) LYMAN PAQUETTE ( 482-4479 ) HUGH HOWIE ( 634-4929 ) JEFF TAYLOR ( 244-8583 ) JEFF TAYLOR ( 244-8583 ) GEORGE CHAMBERS. 14 RICHOME COURT SCARBOROUGH. ONTARIO. M1K 2Y1 ( 416-751-7559 )

TORONTO TIMEX-SINCLAIR USERS CLUB

Editorial

The new club executive will be voted in by the in-town members at the October meeting. While this arrangement seems to work for us, I can't help but wonder if we could be doing more. Are you being served? Can you think of something that you'd like to see changed or improved? We're here to help. Just let us know.

Special thanks to Dan Elliott of Cabool, Missouri, for his quick repair of one of our blown 2068s. While he can't promise such fast service, I think a two week turnaround is pretty amazing. See his info sheet in this issue.

By the way, I want to see more articles. Well, what else would you expect an editor to say?

That's all for now...

J.T.

RAINY DAY THOUGHT-

Was out fishing recently when the rain came skipping1 and splashing across the surface of the lake. I just sat there and the thought came to me that this is how Noah must have felt in the Great Flood as the rains came thundering down. Next thought was that he must have spent a lot 6*f time fishing. Final thought was that in the midst of all that water Noah could not do much f i shing .

He only had two worms

H . H H

DID YOU KNOW ??

THAT THE BRITISH TREASURY USED ROMAN BEAN COUNTERS UNTIL 1826 ! ! THAT'S RIGHT 1826.

ACCORDING TO AN ARTICLE IN THE TORONTO STAR (AUG 27 91)

Ill INTO XVI DOESN'T COMPUTE

Q - HOW DO YOU ADD AND SUBTRACT ROMAN NUMERALS ?

A ~ THERE IS NO ABSTRACT SYSTEM. EITHER CONVERT THEM TO ARABIC NUMERALS OR DO AS THE ROMANS DID: GET AN ABACUS.

SINGLE SUMS THEY DID IN THEIR HEADS OR ON THEIR FINGERS. AS SHORT CUTS, ONE HAND ADDED UP TO V. BOTH HANDS CAME TO X. THEN THEY TOOK OFF THEIR SANDELS OR GOT OUT THE OLD ABACUS. USUALLY IT WAS JUST A FLAT SURFACE (•from the GREEK abax) MARKED WITH COLUMNS OF THE SHORT-CUTS (V X C etc.) AND THEY SHOVED PEBBLES OR BEADS SHAPED LIKE HAMBURGER BUNS AROUND IT. WHEN THEY GOT 10 I'S THEY MOVED ONE COUNTER TO THE X COLUMN, AND SO ON. TRICKS TO

COMPLICATED TO EXPLAIN HERE PERMITTED ADDITION, SUBTRACTION AND, TO SOME EXTENT, MULTIPLICATION AND DIVISION.

IT WAS A CLUMSY SYSTEM, EVEN WHEN BEADS OR METAL COUNTERS WERE STRUNG ON WIRES TO MAKE A SORT OF POCKET CALCULATOR, BUT IT PERSISTED IN EUROPE FOR CENTURIES BECAUSE ONLY SCHOLARS GRASPED ARABIC (ACTUALLY HINDU) NOTATION.

NOW AREN'T YOU PLEASED YOU HAVE A QL BILL LAWSON

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3

BOB'S No tebo ok By SrtiStt£ttl&.t.

iaiM Ul'l PROGRAMMING OPTIONS...

This is the third in the series of tutorials on TOOLKIT; this tine, some of options useful in altering listings will be covered. The remainder will be included in the final part next t i me .

RIGHT JUSTIFICATION...

Vou may have noticed that these articles are being prepared using the Pixel Print Professional <PPP> progran also available from the club library. In the first article, I started with no right justification which is my preference because of the strange spacing encountered. Nevertheless, I did the second using the Hscript to PPP conversion routine provided by Stan Lemke which does its own justification and so I'll stay with this latter method for the remaining two articles. Compare the two methods and decide for yourself which you prefer whenever you use PPP.

TUO NOTES RE PROMPTS. . .

i> All prompts requiring line numbers actually reject any line above 9996. This leaves three lines which can be used for SRUE or other routines and of course line 9999 which is best made RANDOMIZE USR 60606 <6E4 if you want to save bytes). This is a handy way of reactivating TOOLKIT from BASIC: a quick 60 TO 9999 and there's the menu.

2> Vou can avoid the awkward entering of TOKENS in SEARCH strings by turning ON the DISABLE NEW option <W>. If you are searching for, say, all 60 TOs, hold down the Symbol Shift and A key and the next key press will be taken as K mode, ie, pressing g will input 60 TO. Much easier than all that deleting, backing up and going forward you are probably used to.

PROGRAMING OPTIONS. . .

The following options are extremely useful to anyone who does a lot of meddling with listings, either his/her own or someone

else's. Two of the ones I use most often are Search and List and Search and Replace. Let's examine them first.

@ SEARCH AND LIST

As usual with many of the TOOLKIT options, the start and finish lines are requested. The next prompt is for a string of characters or TOKENS (see note 2 above) not more than 32 in number. The display will then very quickly show all the lines containing the given string. If you want this information to go to the TS2646 printer, BREAK into BASIC before using this option and enter OPEN #2,"p"; then all the output will go to the printer but the prompts and menu will stay at the screen. If you prefer to use your wide printer, make it RANDOMIZE USR 166: OPEN #2,,,lp". Remember to set the line length and left margin, etc.

When searching for a TOKEN, eg, REM, you may get lines with no REM in them. But the code for REM will be part of the line content and there's no way to avoid this.

B ALTER PR06RAN == SEARCH AND REPLACE

As with Search and List, the start and finish lines are requested. Now the prompts are for OLD and NEW strings, strings meaning any sequence of characters or TOKENS (see note 2 above) from the listing. The OLD and the NEW can be of different lengths. There is a LIST option which I never use but which should be OK if the number of alterations is short.

If the string to be altered contains floating point numbers, it is necessary to alert the program by entering three ampersands before and after the number in either or both OLD STRIN6 or NEW STRIN6. For example, to change 66 T6 3686 to 66 T6 jj wherever it appears in a listing (block), the form would be: <6LD STRIN6: 66 T6 &a&3888&&&, NEW STRIN6 : 66 T6 jj>. The maximum string length in each case including the ampersands is 32. If you use BIN, put the ampersands before the BIN and after the bits. Vou can get Error 6 if the number is too large or even Error 4 but no damage will occur.

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H DELETE LINES

Enter the start and finish lines; needed for Spectrum only.

H MERGE LINES

Makes a specified block of lines into ONE. Match out for GO TO destinations, REM lines and the liftit of 127 commands per line. Frankly, long lines can be a real nuisance: in tight memory situations they are difficult to EDIT or return to the listing; the longer the line the slower the cursor movement when it is being EDITed . I seldom use this one but I do have a separate utility that will undo such a ness if anyone is interested. It breaks a line down into its separate statements, each with its own line number.

UPPER CASE LDUER CASE

Uery useful when tidying up a listing. Since it is easier to spot TOKEHs if all variables are in lowers, it is better to have the listing in all lowers, except for texts in strings. These two options allow you to convert letters between specified lines and gives you the option to include or exclude characters inside the string quotes. There is also a good utility provided by Steven Gunhouse and available in the Omnibus disk which lets you change all variables into lower case. TOOLKIT cannot be this sel ect i ve .

H LOCATE TOKEN

This givens the address in both decimal and hex of the first character after the line number and length pointer in a stated line; it gives an error if the line is non-existent.

H COHPACTOR

Enter the start and finish line. This option then deletes any unnecessary characters, (eg, spaces and colour controls) OUTSIDE quotes. It ignores lines starting with REM but will affect messages after REMs occurring later in a line.

This is a sample of a Search a List of the token REM in a block of lines between 4600 and 7000.

Note that line 6240 does not show a REM. Toolkit cannot distinguish between the code for REM which is 234 and a 234 as part of a number. In this case 6e4=60000=234*256+96 .

4230 GO TO m3: REM D

4306 GO SUB 2246: GO TO 4110: REM K

4366 GO SUB 2306: GO TO 4116: REM Q

4428 PRINT Mod: GO TO ob : GO TO 1166: REM M

5266 PRINT ttod : GO TO od : PRINT ttod : LORD "doctor .Bb " s REM R

6266 GO SUB 2488: GO TO m3s : REM R

6240 PRINT ttod: LORD tstk.Cl CODE : RRNDOMIZE USR 59696: RRNDOMIZE USR 6e4

6488 GO SUB 2578: GO TO m3 : REM U

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PRINTER INTERFACES AND DRIVER SOFTWARE A primer by George Chambers

GENERAL

There are a number of printer interfaces ava i I ab I e to TS2068 owners who decide they want to hook a large printer onto their TS2068, This series of articles is intended to remove some of the mystery surround ing the use of large printers on the TS2068.

These articles will be confined to the printer inter faces/dr iver software that I am familiar with; namely Tasman, Aerco, Hacksel, and Larken LKDOS. I will not attempt to cover the same ground as the instruction sheets for each of these systems. Rather I shall try to convey a sense of how each system operates, and the id iosyncrac ies of each, and the differences between them, which often lead to confus ion.

Since I certianly do not have all the answers to this appl i cat i on do please feel free to comment and provide further enl ightenment on the subject. I shall include your suggestions in the series.

I propose to discuss interfaces and the software genera 1 1 y in the first

article, then in subsequent articles cover each of the four driver

softwares mentioned, with programming examples for each.

**********************

The use of a large printer on the TS2068 requires the addition of a printer interface board. This is a circuit which translates the signals coming from the 2068 into a form usable by the printer concerned. There are several such interfaces ava i I ab I e. Three of the most widely used are the Tasman, the Aerco, and the Hacksel. There is also the Oliger, the A &. J, and the British ZX LPRINT, that I am aware of.

All the above-mentioned systems are designed to drive a large printer through a Centron ics-sty I e parallel port.

The Timex TOS disk system can also handle a large printer, however it is designed to work to a printer with a serial port.

The majority of printers are equipped with a parallel port, some with a serial port, while a few offer both serial and parallel ports. We shall be dealing with the interfaces that serve printers with a parallel port.

The Tasman printer interface was probably the first one around. It was designed or ig inal I y for the Spectrum, and was later adapted for use on the TS2068. The Aerco iff was next, and has proved to be the most popular and widely used. An Aerco I ook-al ike, built by Peter Hacksel, is a more recent vers ion.

Each of the interfaces plugs into the rear bus of the 2068, and is connected to the printer via a ribbon cable. There is also a version of the Hacksel interface which plugs into the cartridge dock, with the ribbon coming out the front and passing underneath to the rear of the computer. All these interfaces are designed to provide a parallel output and to plug into a parallel Centronics type port I jack on the printer.

There is not much mystery about the interface hardware. It Is simply there and does it's job accord ing to the dictates of the driver software assoc iated with it. Consequently we shall not discuss it further, but instead concentrate on the driver software, where most of the m i sunder stand ing arises.

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Printer Driver Software

Software is needed to make the printer interfaces effective. In addition to the driver software put out by Tasman, Aerco, Hacksel, and 01 iger for their systems, there have been a number of other drivers written and marketed. The Larken LKDOS contains built-in software driver code, as does the 01 iger disk system. Jack Dohany has also put out driver software.

This software consists of a block of code which may range from 200-odd bytes up to 1300 bytes. Sometimes the code is designed to reside in upper memory, sometimes in the printer buffer. Driver software with many features will reside in upper memory, because of the amount of space it requ ires. Where upper memory is used by a large program, for example 0MN1CALC or MASTERF I LE, there is no room for the code in upper memory. The Tasman copes with this by prov id ing several short versions which are installed in the printer buffer area starting at address 23296,

We might mention that in the case of the Tasword and Mscript word-processors, each have their own integral printer driver software. The Tasword incorporates the graphics symbol arrangement of "tas intcode" for imp I ement ing printer control codes.

Similarly, Mscript seems to have adopted the same sort of arrangement . The character ">" at the start of a line tells Mscript that we are giving it a printer command. Simple control codes then follow the ">" symbol , We can also define a number of printer control codes by means of a "Format line", and then invoke them with a Function-G command in the body of the text. See the word-processor manuals for more detailed descr i pt ions.

When we decide to make use of the large printer the driver software must be loaded into the computer. And the computer must also be "pointed" to the location of this new software, so that when a call to print is given the computer looks to this new software, rather than to the 2040 software. Let us backtrack a bit.

When the 2068 is first turned on it is set up ready to serve the 2040 printer. The software for this purpose is located in ROM at address 1280, The computer stores a pointer to that address in a system variable at a double address 26703/04. (A variable, incidental I y, not identified in the user manual). If you PEEK these addresses you will get values of 0 and 5, (Try PRINT PEEK 26703 + 256 * PEEK 26704).

Whenever we decide to use a large printer we have to change the values in this "pointer" address so that it points to the start of our new driver software.

The TASMAN software does this as part of it's RAND USR 64719 initialization. In the case of the Aerco and Hacksel drivers the correct values must be POKEd manually. The LKDOS takes care of this internal I y; with a default to the Aerco, If you have an Aerco i/f you do not need to worry about it. Otherwise you need to do a POKE to the Larken ROM if you wish to make use of a Tasman, A & J, or a user-def ined interface routine.

We shall now deal with each of the several printer drivers, TASMAN

In the case of the Tasman software, called "tas intcode", it comes with a Baste program which allows the user to customize the software to the needs of the particular printer being used. Once it has been "conditioned" there is an option to test it, and an option to save this customized copy to tape, e zn,s

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The Tasman "tas intcode" software loads at 64716, and is 652 bytes in length. When loaded, it is in it ial ized by RANDOMIZE USR 647/9. This USR call, among other things, pokes values 238 and 253, into the pointer addresses 26703/04 respect ive I y. This points the 2068 to the driver code starting address of 65006.

The Tasman driver code has an interest ing feature, in that it allows you to instal several printer control funct ions, des ignat ing various 2068 graphics symbols to imp! ement them. Whenever one wants to engage a printer function one simply enters the graphic symbol for that funct ion, into the text being printed. When the driver encounters this symbol, it looks up a table and sends out the printer control code sequence assigned to the symbol. The printer control function comes into force immediately.

The Tasman software also has another interest ing quirk relating to sending printer control codes, which can prove troub I esome if one is unaware of it. That is, it can handle printer control codes only with the CHR$ mode, and not with the OUT instruction (At least I have not been able to do it!). More about that under the heading "CHR$ versus OUT Commands" .

In addition to the "tas intcode" software, Tasman also provides several short code blocks that locate in the printer buffer area of memory. Each has a unique capability. For example, "tasmini" does a screen text copy; "tasepson" does a b/w screen copy; "tasbuff", which is an abbrev iated version of "tas intcode" . And there are other drivers designed for specific pr inters.

HACKSEL

When the Hacksel i/f hardware first appeared it made use of the Aerco software. However, copyr ight restr ict ions required that new software be developed for it. The software that was eventually supplied consisted of three separate and distinct blocks of code. There was "LPRINT" CODE 65000,500; "b+w62300" CODE 62300,500; and col or61000" CODE 61000, 1300.

Each of these had a different funct ion. "LPRINT" allowed you to use the LPRINT and LLIST commands. To use, you CLEAR 64999, load the code, then POKE 26704,254. The POKE "points" the 2068 to the Hacksel code (PEEK 26703 * 256 * PEEK 26704 = 65024).

The "b+w63200" will allow a high resol ut ion black and white screen copy to the full sized printer. This assumes that the printer is an EPSON compat ibl e with graphics capabilities. To copy a screen, simply load this code, then instead of using the COPY command, use RANDOMIZE USR 62300. Note that because you are not invoking the LPRINT or LLIST commands one does not need to "point" the 2068 to this address.

"co I or61 000" is a more complex piece of code. With it you can also do a high resol ut ion screen copy as with the b+w63200", however the printout will be in shades of grey for the corresponding colours on the screen. To execute, use RANDOM IZE USR 61000. No "pointer" is required.

All three of these Hacksel softwares can be loaded at the same time, without interfer ing with each other. You can save them as a single block of code by SAVE "name" CODE 61000,4535.

The instruct ion sheets that come with the Hacksel interface provide a list of POKEs for the several Tasman software drivers, to make them compat ibl e with the Hacksel interface. This could be useful, since the Tasman drivers have features not present in the Hacksel and the Aerco

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software drivers.

Presumabl y the modified Tasman software will work with the Aerco i/f also.

Now, there is something else to watch out for. The Aerco and Hacksel software offer two methods of sending informat ion to the printer. They can send out the TS2068 character set, or a true ASCII character set. The best descr ipt ion I can give of this is to be found in the Hacksel instruct ion sheet, as follows:

"Al though the 2068 character set is ASCII compat ibl e, it is not exactly the same as ASCII. For example, printing the character 255 on the 2068 will give the four letters that make up the word COPY. This is only true for the 2068 and is necessary for execut ing the LLIST command. This (LPRINT) routine will do this automatically for you. If you execute the command LPRINT CHR$ 255, then the four letters C, O, P, and Y will be sent to the printer. However there are some occasions where this is not to your advantage. The main instance is when you wish to send control characters to change fonts, underline, and so forth. In these cases the true ASCII codes must be sent directly, and not be converted to the 2068 character set. With this software you may select the true ASCII set by using the POKE 65535, 1 command. If you wish to return to the 2068 character set, then use the command POKE 65535,0."

In the use of a large printer on the 2068 the above statement is very s ignif icant, and if ignored will lead to great f rust rat ions.

I mentioned that the Aerco and Hacksel have this "dual" character set with the need to make a se I ect ion. This appears to be a common feature of most, if not all North American produced driver software. The Larken LKDOS uses this convent ion, also.

But Tasman does not refer to it, and does not seem to require it. The answer may be in it's use of a double "CHR$ 27" in it's printer control commands. More on that in a later article demonstrat ing Tasman printer contro I s.

AERCO DRIVERS

The Aerco software consists of 1111 bytes of code, which is loaded at address 64256. The original package as supplied is accompanied with a Basic program to customise the driver to suit a particular printer. Nine printers are named in the option table. If your printer is not in the list, then you must experiment with the 7 opt ions prov ided and hope that one will suit your printer. One of them usually will.

As is the case with the Hacksel, the Aerco software has two basic modes. The default mode is for use with the Timex Basic system, and automat ical I y expands all tokens as they are encountered. We'll refer to it as the "Timex Basic" mode. Aerco calls the other mode LITERAL; this corresponds to the Hacksel term "true ASCII set".

The Aerco "Timex Basic" mode is selected by POKE 64256,1

The other mode, termed LITERAL in the Aerco instruct ions, is where the characters are sent to the printer with no changes made to them. Use the LITERAL mode to send control characters to the printer, and for bit-mapped

graph ics.

Select this mode by POKE 64256,0

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9

Other POKEs provided in the Aerco instruct ions are:

To set the width of the printer: POKE &43256~, w idth-1 To send LINE FEED after CARRIAGE RETURN: POKE 6*260,10 To suppress LINE FEED after CARRIAGE RETURN: POKE 64260,0 To select Timex 2040 printer: POKE 26703,0; POKE 26704,5 To select Centronics printer: POKE 26703,0; POKE 26704,251

5 Ci4R<r;

In order to do a screen copy use the command LPRINT USR 1, To make use of this command you must have a printer with a dot matrix printer with b it-mapped graphics capab i I ity. The printer needs to be set up in this mode. Look to your printer instruct ion sheet to determine the necessary control characters.

LARKEN LKDOS

Any Larken disk system owners who do not range much beyond Tasword and Mscript may wonder what all the fuss about printers drivers is. Well you may wonder. When I got my Larken system I carefully put aside all my printer driver softwares, to see whether I would ever need them again. Essent ial I y, I never looked back. Until this project came up! I stayed ^ with the Tasword and Mscript drivers; there did not seem to be much point to changing them. But everything else was Larken, except for b it-mapped graphics software.

The Larken printer driver is in the LKDOS ROM, with cert i an of it's variables in the LKDOS RAM. Variables such as printer interface type, Line length, Left margin setting, the LF with CR feature. Variables one might want to customise for a particular application.

The system defaults to Aerco (Hacksel) Interface, I ine length 64, LF with CR, and a margin of 0. Changing them requires LKDOS-type POKEs.

The selection between the LITERAL and Timex Basic that we described earlier on the Aercol Hacksel drivers is also done in the Larken driver, with an LKDOS POKE.

The LKDOS has a useful feature. One can open any channel to the printer. The most usful channels for this purpose are #3 and #5. More on this in a later LKDOS demonstrat ion article.

ZX81 - MYSTERY PROGRAM

This is a short program which enables a Basic instruct ion to be trans I at ed into machine code without the use of an interpreter or assembly code. When you have finished entering it, simply press RUN and all will be made clear.

5 REM FOR ZX81 IN SLOW MODE 10 LET A= 16509

15 PRINT TAB 2; PEEK A*256+PEEK (A+1)

20 LET L-PEEK ( A+2)+256*PEEK ( A+3)-1

25 LET A=A+3 30 FOR N=1 TO L

35 IF PEEK (N+A)<>126 THEN GO TO 50 40 LET N=N+5 45 GO TO 55

50 PRINT CHR$ (PEEK (N+A));

55 NEXT N

60 LET A=A+N+1

65 IF A<16914 THEN GO TO 15

70 LET A$="B-9B25%.885E "

75 FOR N=1 TO LEN AS 80 FOR J=1 TO 50 85 NEXT J

90 PRINT AT 15,12+N;CHR$ (CODE A$(N)+144) 95 NEXT N

Taken from the April '82 issue of Your Computer - Vol.2 No. 4

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NEW QL LIBRARY NOW READY

The Mew style QL Library is now ready. I think I have got all the bugs oat of it, and I also think you will like its format. Whether in color or monochrome.

The original catalogue was in Abacus as I did not know how to do it in Archive. But I hare been learning and I have by hook and by crook, begged borrowed purloined amended and in many other ways evolved a Library Catalogue that I feel will be of real interest to all QL users.

"TorQLib" (for Toronto QL Library) the title I have given this, is easy to use, and has six main fields, plus a number of others, that nake it very comprehensive. You will be able to use this to form your own library on almost any subject. To do this you nay wish to go into the program and alter a few things, but that is not so hard to do. loreover, the exercise will enhance your knowledge of Archive.

On running TorQLib you are presented with the START screen which is a short statement. [ENTER] to proceed.

The next screen will allow you

to SELECT how you wish to use

TorQLib. You are given the choice of:-

(1) The Complete File

(2) Disk

(3) Title

(4) Author

(5) Quit. (To Quit Archive and

close files)

You are also asked if you wish

the file in Order (Sorted) (Y/H.) This will take you to the "TorQLib" screen where all is revealed. Each file is displayed in its entirety, with lots of information on show.

The main fields used are.'-

Title

-- Category

Disk

Author

Size

Reference

Next there is a large window to display all the files Associated with the Title. The size in bytes is. also displayed of each segment of the file.

There are Windows for Loading and Remarks. Also a window to tell you the Number of the file selected and to tell you the amount of Memory Remaining.

Finally, there is a menu from which you may select how you operate the file by the use of one_letter (ENTER) commands :-

A-Back_10

Z-Forard_10

B-Back (1)

F-First

N-Next

L-Last

S-Select

P-Print

Q-Quit

There is one other command in the menu, and that is for use when the Archive command "Find" is used. When you use FIND in Archive, the file is rewound to the beginning and a search is made for the first occurrance of the string you are looking

for. If that is not correct then "C-Continue" will progress to the next occurance of that string, and so on.

The PRINT command will give you a hard copy of the whole or selected files, in nice presentation, 12 files to a page.

On the TorQLib disk, I have included a _doc file which will give you a lot of useful information on the use of the Library in particular, and may be of interest to you on some aspects of Archive in general.

The library is on 5 1/4 1440 (80 track) disks. As this would appear to be the QL disk format most popular. I can also put the Library on 720 (40 track) or on 3 1/2 disk. Cartridge would take a host of them to hold the complete Library. There are at the moment 217 titles in the Library. Some good, some

Available to members of 'TTSUC' ONLY.

The Categories used are '.-

Communications 1 Disks

Demonstration 1

Games 1

Graphics 1

Maths 1 "

Special 3 "

Utility 2

Z88 1

Psion

Plus the "TorQLib" itself of course.

NOTE:- EXTRA OF 256K+ IS

(Not tested) 1 (Psion related) Library disk

MEMORY ESSENTIAL

To order TorQLib Catalogue Disk.please send formatted medium and return postage/packing. I will be only too pleased to answer any questions you might have at that time. This edition of the Library is much improved over the last one, containing many useful additions which I am sure you will find of value and interest. This is the final format of the QL Library which I wll present to the Club.

Additions - YES. Alterations to format - NO \

Hugh H Howie. QL Librarian. 586 Oneida Dr. Burlington. Out. Canada. L7T 3Y3

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11

DAYTON COMPUTERFEST 1991

by Your Roving Reporter

One night at supper my wife said that since I got that darn computer we never went anywhere. So I thought a bit then asked how she would like a trip down south. That was fine with her, when do we leave and where do we go. I replied that we could head south and stop at Dayton the first night and have a look around, and take it from there. GREAT.

We arrived in Dayton on the Friday early afternoon, and we drove around till I found a small store, my wife asked me what I bought and I said I was looking for something and changed the subject.

Short time later we drove past the Hara Arena and my wife said "Oh! they are having a Computer Show here to-morrow" Then a gasp and total silence.

Saturday we went to the Show, and owing to my having purchased my tickets the day before, (the "something" I was looking for) I saved a dollar on each ticket, and we were able to walk right in without joining the quarter mile-long cash pay line.

On entering the arena whcih has a wooden floor, and chandeliers all over the place, looks a mile long and almost the same wide, and wall to wall computers. Struggled through the masses to a slightly lower floor, round a corner and I am in the Sinclair Section. Must be about fifty feet along one wall. There was Cats, Istug, Tsnug, CATUG, Quanta, and of course my old friend Paul Holmgren, the only one I knew, and his partner Frank Da vies.

ZXir Clive Alive was represented by Don Lambert and Bob Swogger. But no real identification. I wonder how many new members they got?

I had a little difficulty in finding the Sinclair Section as the signs they had stuck on the wall were not as distinct as I would have liked to see. There was not too much on display, mainly books, newsletters etc, and at Paul's table some bits of this and that and some software. I got some 5 1/4 discs from him at a good price. However the action was not too bad.

From Paul and Frank, I gathered there was a strong possibility that Miracle Systems in England did not know there was a JSU version of the QL, and perhaps this would account for some of the difficulty I am having with the Gold Card.

I spoke to Ruth Fegler from CATS group for a short time, where she had as well as her own material, some books etc., from SHARP'S who was also at the show, but on a higher level, surrounded by all types of computers, but NO SINCLAIR.

I spoke to Mark Steuber for a while between customers, and he still is interested in Sinclair, but it is definately not his main source of income now-a-days. I would say that he handles it because he always has done so.

As I said earlier, the main floor is of wood, all others are of concrete. One thing very obvious was that the wooden floor section was nice and cool, the concrete floor section was very very hot. Obviously they do a lot of Banquets at the Hara Arena.

The lower sections are not a full floor lower but rather a half floor lower, accessed by a ramp which is much easier to handle than a flight of stairs. The whole complex is vast, I do not think the Auto Building at the Ex would hold all that was there.

There were Discs in all shapes and sizes. I got some 5 1/4 at a good price, and went looking for some 3 1/2, but I could not better the price I would pay in Canada for them. Sure there were plenty, mainly done up in bundles of 25 or 50 or 100, at prices from 37 cents and up, with the average about 65 cents for so-called good ones. Once again, in bulk, un- named, no labels, many pre-f or matted. I decided the gamble was not worth the price. After all I can get name brand discs in Canada for anything from 75/85 in boxes of ten plus, including labels. Sometimes less.

3 1/2 uncased disk drives were there in their dozens. At opening the price was from $45 to $57. But as the day wore on, this price stabilised at $55, such was the

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DAYTON COMPUTERFEST 1991

(Continued)

success of the show. Paul Holmgren did not know what kind of day he had as he had not had time to keep score. He appeared happy.

When assessing prices at the show it was essential to remember the extra 16 percent we had to pay for our US currency, so that something costing $20.00 was really costing us $23.20. This made the disc drive at $55 cost me $63.00. This for the same drive I was buying in Toronto a few weeks ago for $39.95! The 3 1/2 disc at 65 cents would cost me 75 cents, in this light caution had to be the "watch- word. I am of the opinion that prices were high. That the show was a success as far as the dealer went is a foregone conclusion. In more than one instance I felt that prices increased in the short time I was there.

At 5pm when the show closed for the day, the general concesus of opinion was it had been a great success. Smiles on all dealers faces, and empty tables. Still a another day to come on the Sunday. I did not stay for that one.

Before I went to Dayton, I made up some cards representing the club. Plus a few application forms to hand to anyone interested. Handed out a few but not many. I also made up a card to wear indicating my affiliation. This was a really wonderful opener to anyone I spoke to. Bringing me back to what I mentioned at the beginning, in the Sinclair Section which was not large there was a lack of group identification. Perhaps it was thought that no indentification was necessary. In the whole show there was almost a complete lack of personal identification among representatives. Mark Steuber had his name on his chest, and a few others. Even the major companies at the show were suffering from this. I Ike to know to whom I am speaking.

?ls a Computer Show it had to be a great success. As a Sinclair show it was Uh rJh. If this is the best we can do then we are in a sorry state. From the action E saw at Pauls' desk I would say there is still plenty of Sinclair interest out there, low to harness that interest is the problem.

I would really like to have Toronto try for a Computer Fest next year, but the logistics are not in place. We would have to rely on what support we have in a small area, all that area to the south. I am sure Sharp's would not come this far north as his business is 90% IBM clones. There are no other Sinclair dealers in this area. I do not see many people travelling 400 miles plus to come to Toronto on a chance. RMG would not come this far. Would our friends to the East do so? We have no one who is in the marketing sector who would wish to travel this distance. So let Toronto give up thoughts of a Fest. After all, with the poor appearance of the Sinclair section at the Dayton Show to go by, I would say that we are relegated to an out of the way corner in larger shows, to keep in touch with our friends. Too bad.

So we left Dayton on the Sunday morning and headed for Virginia and the Blue Ridge Drive where it was all that foggy wet stuff so that you could see nowhere. Two days like that and then back to K- Mart and Wal-Mart. Then head for home.

The big shock was to get back to Canada and gasoline prices of 57 cents a litre. We were buying gas down there at 1.08 to 1.18 a gallon. Thats about 28 C/Litre.

Consider SNUG as folded I would say. TSNUG may but only may, fill the gap. UPDATE I wonder. I often ponder that even UPDATE may not last too long. I renewed my subscription, but I did not notice an over abundance of action at that table.

Anyway, here we are at home and now my wife can -not say I never take her anywhere. She has had her week away from the stove, just letting other folks serve her, and she loved it. We stopped eating at the fast food places as the food was all the same. Cost us more, but we ate better. Almost as good as home.

A pleasant trip, and many new friends made, and many phone voices and writers now have bodies. §

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1

Setting Up LKDOS User-Def ined Commands by Steven Gunhouse

In the May issue of Sine-Link (vol.9 no. 3), Bob's Notebook discusses using the LKDOS user defined command to invoke an NMI-F routine, but points out that he usually gets an error when he does this. There are ways around this, however.

The problem is that the routines end with a RET instruct ion. This is the right thing to do with an NMJ routine, it