SINC LINK

VOL.8 NO.

SINC-LINK IS A PUBLICATION OF THE TORONTO TIMEX-SINCLAIR USERS CLUB AND IS ISSUED 6 TIMES A YEAR. COPIES OF THE NEWSLETTER ARE SI. 50 EACH FOR NON-MEMBERS. CLUB MEMBERS RECEIVE FREE COPIES AS PART OF THE 920.00 ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP FEE. A NEWSLETTER SUBSCRIPTION ONLY IS AVAILABLE FOR S12.00.

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Attention: SINC-LINK EDITOR TORONTO TIMEX-SINCLAIR USERS CLUB, 14 RICHOME COURT, SCARBOROUGH, ONTARIO, CANADA M1K 2Y1

OCT 'SO

TORONTO TIHEX-SINCLfllR USERS CLUB

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS:

PRESIDENT:

TREASURER:

SECRETARY:

ACTIVITIES:

TAPE LIBRARIAN ZX81 :

TAPE LIBRARIAN 2068:

TAPE/DISK LIBRARIAN QL:

PAPER LIBRARIAN:

NEWSLETTER:

LIAISON OFFICER:

( Out-of-town members )

(Area Code 416) RENE BRUNEAU ( 531-9749 ) BILL LAWSON ( 444-8772 ) GEORGE CHAMBERS C 751-7559 ) RENE BRUNEAU ( 531-9749 ) LYMAN PAQUETTE ( 482-4479 ) RENATO ZANNESE ( 635-6536 ) HUGH HOWIE ( 634-4929 ) JEFF TAYLOR ( 244-8583 ) JEFF TAYLOR ( 244-8583 ) GEORGE CHAMBERS, 14 RICHOME COURT, SCARBOROUGH. ONTARIO, M1K 2Y1 ( 416-751-7559 )

TORONTO TT I MEK S I NCLA I » USERS CLUE> 1

Tutorial

I'll keep it short this time.

1 4hile the western worlds navies are steaming around the Person Gulf, Keep this in mind Many of those ships have command and control sy terns run W computers with FAMs no l^ger ^clock speeds no faster than our "dinky toy computers .

Makes me kinda ^ond r Just now big ones' home computer really needs to be .

Software

Keep on Sinc-ing

/ ;

2 2

1 1 1 1

2 1 1

n

TS2068 in original box TS2068 good cond it ion Aerco Printer interfaces Disk Drives Panasonic

HH DSDD Power suppl y,Coleco type Power Supply for Drives TS2040 printer TS2040 Printer JIL Data Recorders 2068 Technical Manual 2050 modem, uncased

$60 $50 $30

$uo

$20 $20 $20 $12 $12 $6 $5

EMSof t

for the QL that

works hard

Now has in-stock the very best M WYSIWYG QL word-processor. tex*\ v3 00 with spell check and several new features. (includes 1 help line).

hr USA $94 . 95

Absolutely no pun intended) J.T.

FOR SALE! FOR SALE! FOR SALE!

; - ql computer and Power Supply

2 - spare microdr ives

22 Microdrive cartridges

(some with programs) _ Collection od micr idr ive st ickers

& ql accessor les. QDOS Companion Manual OL Service Manual A notes Original QL Users Minual . QL Technical Guide oy Tony Tebbie

Asking $200 make an offer

Lou Champagne (tel. 416 338 1176) 1U-69 Jefferson Cresc. Oakvil le, Ont . L6H 3G5

FOR SALE! FOR SALE! FOR SALE!

Tax-time means

RECIPE

INVENTORY

TRUST_FUND

QLAND_LORD

MAILBAG

DBTutor

DBProgs

CDIR/BOOTS

TAX-l-QL/89

_dbf

_dbf

_dbf

__dbf

_dbf

_dbf

_dbf

SBas

On 5 ?5" DD or QD disks. On microcartridge add $2.00.

FREE CATALOGUE

JEETjMT Soft P.O. Box 8763 Boston MA 02114 (617)889-0830

$24.95 $14.95

$9.95 $24.95 $24.95 $24.95 $24.95 $19.95

$9.95

3.5" or

ea

ea,

ea

Rolls paper Plus other ZX81

zOU-0 Radio S.$3 ea. and misc. stuff

If interested write G. Chambers see address on cover of newsletter Also see my out-of-town members letter for more details.

Two tough things to find for your Tlmex or Sinclair ZX/T3 computer--

GOLID INFORMATION & GOOD CONNECTORS

YOU KNOW WHERE TO GET THE BEST INFO FOR YOUR ZX/TS--SYNTAX, SQ, & ™E FOYT DOOK CHECK IT OUT ASK ANYONE THEN GET 'EM ALL FOR

JUST $19 .95 plus $10 S&H

BUS CONNECTOR & EXTENDER & HOUSING

LIKE A PRINTER CONNECTOR

Keyed Connector, Extender PC Board Hus Molded Black Plastic Housing Fits: 2X80 & 81 TS1000 & 1500 PC8300

ZX/TS SUBSET OF SPECTRUM & 2063

Pkg of 3, ONLY $13.95 plus $2 S&H

S*VE 2S for $ 2^95 He Stt SAVE

EMS, Box 8763, Boston, MA 02114-87/ 617-889-0830 VISA & MC Add 4%

J 7*

101' S Notebook:

Making Graphs With LK005 U3,

The LKD ha v put i n i ss us i com nev t ha a w pro cam ere

re OS e y t o his ue n9 man er t . hi 1 9r a e t ate

are et

?s

of t he d t occ

I t

e a m 1 he

d.

many

s i on to be od us 1 1 er Sinc- R AN D

0 do ur r ed inker nd ca

1 s t ed two s

use 3 EP

eeXC in t Link

USR 9rap

t o ed w e u

bel amp 1

s for ROM th 1 or ed arru K he nay

SUQ9G

108 :

hs. It me to i th it P with o w . es i

Fr t

the at and enny , /Jun st ed DRAU had do for the om it

The methodology here is quite simple but a few explanations might be helpful:

Line Explanation

13C Names or the bars are

read into array a* from the DflTR line They could be product names or starr names v etc.

16C The (x ieec) clarifies

the scale being used for the lower chart.

ieo Scale markers are

printed; the "flT" values position these dotvn the right side and in reverse order: (5-j) j so that '•©•• is at the bo t torn.

210 The month initials are printed across the bottom or the chart. 220 rnd is used to simulate

some values. 230 The bars are drawn

alternately black and grey (x does this! 27G The upper chart is now

printed . 320 Note the uuay the months are printed for the horizontal bars vs the verticals in line 210. Rlso the months are in reverse order. 330 Simple markers; lines could be used via PLOT and DRRU . 4-10 R subroutine to draw a

border around the chart.

On ly tuuo LKDOS patterns have been used in this demo. There are eight others plus a user definable one.

Bars could be placed closer together or even touching to get more data on the screen.

Tim

1 i s y o u ,i u s ad j the col P i x get c a u t a k

e now ting

to type in the and RUN it to see if the SCREENS looking ht. Vou might have to he spacing here and

the strings; this s being written using int Professional and the listing into PPP sed some uneven spacing. It es getting used to!

get t r ust re in umn i el Pr ting

In any case, this demo should help you get started at designing your own graphs.

Bob Mitchell 980813.

RERD a*(i) BORDER 0:

100 RANDOMIZE USR 100 OPEN »4, "dd" 110 DIM a*<12,3) 120 RESTORE 390 130 FOR i =1 TO 12 NEXT i

14.0 PRPER 0: INK " CLS

150 RRNDOMIZE

160 PRINT *" SALES Of DOO -Da hs 1989 (X 1000) " 170 GO SUB 4.10

180 FOR J =1 TO 5: PRINT RT j*

4.-1 , 28; ••<••; 5-j : NEXT j

190 LET X=l

200 FOR i =1 TO 12

210 PRINT RT 20,i*2;a*(i, TO

220 LET y=RND*120

230 PLOT 8*i*2,16: PRINT »4 :

DRflU 5,y,x

24.0 LET X=RBS (X-3)

250 NEXT i

260 PRINT t*0; " CENTER3 " : PRUSE 0 270 CLS

280 PRINT '"' SRLES Of DOO

-Dahs 1989,'',• (x 1000)"

290 GO SUB 4.10

300 LET X =1

310 FOR i=l TO 12

320 PRINT RT 2 1 - i -3 , 2 ; a * ( 13 - i ) ; 330 PRINT RT 19 ,5; " t 1 1

34.0 PRINT RT 20,5; "0 1 2

3 ^ 5 11

350 LET y=RND*190

360 PLOT 48,8*i+24: PRINT »4 :

DRRU y , 5 , X 370 LET X=RBS (X-3) 38© NEXT i

390 DRTR " JRN" , "FEB" , "MRR" , "RPR" , "MAY" , "JUN" , "JUL" , "RUG" , "SEP" , "OCT" , "NOU" , DEC" 400 STOP

410 PLOT 2,2: DRRU 252,0: DRRU 0,172: DRRU -252,0: DRRU 0,-172 4.20 RETURN

9000 PRINT 84: SRUE "bars.Bl" LINE 100

Psi CHESS AND THE LARKEN by George Chambers

The Psi CHESS is an excellent chess program. It was put out in 1933 by "The Edge", Covent Garden, London England. It is designed for the Spectrum, and can be played on a Spectrum i zed TS2068. By use of the NMl-key it can be saved to disk with the Larken system.

The program has the capability of saving the pertinent data (about 256 bytes) of a game in progress, for reloading later. The drawback, for a Larken user, is that the SAVE is to tape. This article details how to convert the program to do this save and load to a Larken disk.

The procedure on this disk requires use of four utilities which are to be found on disks #1 and *12 of the club Larken library. The process is complex because I found no easy way to break into the program (all my tricks failed!). This procedure would be appl icable to all such programs.

it was first necessary to locate the SAVE and LOAD routines in the program. By doing some experimental saves and loads it was evident that the data was being saved as a short header I ess block of code. That is to say, there was no header to the saved code. This meant that one could not inspect the saved code for header i nformat ion.

So.... I think the best thing is to prepare two copies of the chess program, over and above your original. What we want to start off wit* is one 9-track (Larken) NMl-save, and or W-track NMl-save copy of the chess pre 7m. We shall call them chess-9 end ches -'0 to s imp! if y things. (You make 9-^rack copies by holding down the CAPS SHIFT key while pressing the 1-5 keys.

Using the programs "crack. 81" and "saver 1 .81 " from library disk #12, I saved a portion of "chess-9", from address 24000, to the top of memory. Maybe I should explain the way it is done. The "crack. 81" program loads the "chess-9 program track-by-track into the computer. As each track is loaded into the computer it is saved off to tape before the next track is called uo. This process is automatic; it takes about 10 minutes to save a program to tape. Then the "saverl 81" proaram is loaded, the tape is played back, ana th<> "chess-9" program is placed back into the comp.ter, again automat ical ly. But with a difference. Only a portion of the "chess-9" has been put back into the computer; that portion from address 24000 ana upwards. The computer has been given a CLEAR 23999 instruction, so there is a bit of room for some short Basic routines. Save this code to disk. SAVE "pchess.CI" CODE 24000,41 535.

we do this so we can get into the chess program and search out the location of the LOAD/SAVE routines. And to find some empty space for our Larken code. We are going to

use tnis tnrormat ion later to modify tne chess-IO program. After we have this information this "pchess.CI" will be d iscarded.

Now to search for the SAVE and LOAD routines. One thing that is common to these routines is the m/c mst ruction LD IX. This equates to a 221 and 33 (decimal) in adjacent addresses. I used a FOR/NEXT loop to search through the program looking for this number seauence. The routine would print out the address of ever* occurrance. There were several. I t en loaded the program "spec48.Cs" (a d isassembler on library disk *12) and took a look at these locations. They looked promising. I took note of two addresses, 42917 and 42934. These were significant because they were CALLS to LOAD and SAVE routines in the Spectrum ROM; addresses 1378 and 1222. I took a printout of the m/c around those addresses.

I propose to do the same with this program as I had done with the "Penetrator" program, described earlier in Sine-Link (Vol. 8 No. 2). That is, introduce a Larken SAVE and LOAD routine in an empty space somewhere in the program, and redirect the ROM calls to the Larken cede. I would need room for about 130 bytes of code. J searched through the memory for some space, and found some starting at address 48400.

Since loading "spec48.Cs" partially corrupted the "chess.CI" program 'n memory, I reloaded it. Then I did a PRINT USR 42893 and PRINT US* 42922 to verify the SAVE and LOAD routines. w0re addresses of m/c leading up to *»• R0M calls SAVE and LOAD. And sure enough these put us into the SAVE and LOAD modes.

I reworked addresses of the "Penetrator" code to suit the new ,ocation. Also, since the original chess ntnnm saves" were header I ess, i.e. had no nlle.onll. Z> to ft. ^ to t». cftftft to satisfy the Larken system.

The Basic listing included here is the result of this. Type this in, SAVE it

48400. Save "chess. CI ,LUUC . ' Save it tc tape, not disk. It will be easier this way.

+ho trirkv part. Although we Now comes the triCKy pw bave been working with the "chess-9 nave uv*" cawfIidaD code has to be

^o\tnn?ro<!rrv

library disk #12 j. ana ( I t'brary d isk 1*1 /

ye are go,>, to use ""J^^^e, « two things. Description of ^aJe. utility is too involved » fQ SQy

Details are on the <*'**' , P0KE

that with this mto the

several numbers d,re*]'LtYi ve shall

"chess-10" program- J'^Jj numbers. POKE four a(jdres.seS e the chess program These numbers will cause tne of to CALL the darken coa^w ne ^ LOAD function is invoked, number s :

Address

U291B

*2919

new no.

16 189

( or ig. no. ) (98) (5)

i*2935 25 (198)

*2936 189 (*)

Note: 16*256*1 89 =*8*01 and 25+256* 1 89=*8*09

calls to the Larken code

Secondly, we shall "mark" the spot where we want to locate the Larken code. Now, we could POKE this code d i rect I y, cont inuing the process described above. However, there are about 125 numbers to be POKEd, and this can be quite a chore. Instead, we are going to make use of the "doctor" utility and the 130-byte block of code (chess. CI) we saved earlier on tape. Using the "doctor" utility we shall load into the computer the track of the "chess-10" program that contains the wanted address *8*00.

But I digress. To mark the track we shall call up addresses *8*00, *8*01 , and *8*02; and POKE a value of 201 into each. We do this to make this address quite distinctive when we search for it later, with "doctor". At the same time, take note of which d i sk-track the 7th track of chess-10 is located. We'll want to know this shortly. The ten disk tracks of "chess-10" appear on the screen of " bopeep" .

Having compl eted the "mark ing" we shall now load "doctor. 81 ". I'm going to make it easy for both of us. I've already determined, by breaking into the "bopeep" program during it's operation, and looking at some of it's variables, that this address, *8*00, is located in the 7th of the 10 tracks of the "chess-10" program. And by using a FOR /NEXT loop to search for the three 201 's on the track while it was in the "doctor" program, I find that the wanted chess-10 address ( *8*00 ) is now at address 51500 in the "doctor" program. Are you still with me? Do check this out.

While you have this track 7 of chess-10 in the "doctor" program, and while you are viewing the (doctor) address 51500 with Option "0", you should see the 201 's that we poked earlier. BREAK from the program, load the "chess. CI" code you saved earlier (be sure to LOAD "chess. C1" CODE 51500). Then get back into the doctor program by pressing the C (CONTINUE) key, then work the "B" and "C" keys. If this fails to put you back into the "doctor" program, then do a GOTO *100. Verify that the code you just loaded is in place starting at address 51500. Note that it over-wr ites the 201 's. If you have done things correctly it will have!

Be sure the disk with chess-10 is still in the drive, and is unprotected. Then re-save the track in "doctor", by pressing the "S" key to save to the same track.

This completes the operation. Load your "chess-1 0" program into the computer (Spectrum mode, of course), and try out the SAVE and LOAD options. Be sure to have an unprotected disk with at least one spare track in the drive. It <~ .uld be the same disk as chess-10 was loaded from. Or

it could be another disk. However the SAVE and LOAD will be to the same drive as the program was originally loaded from. You cannot change drives.

Do a SAVE first, so that who n y ou try a LOAD there will be a chess code f"e load. Otherwise the system will cra.sh' ' assigned the name "chess. Cx" to this code file. It takes one track.

Basic Code Loader

10 FOR n=*8*00 TO *8526 20 READ a: POKE n,a 30 NEXT n 100 DATA 205,33,189,201 ,0,0,0,0

, 0

110 DATA 205,80, 189,201 ,0,0,0,0

120 DATA 2*3,0,205,98,0,33,126, 189, 17, 3*, 32, 1,10, 0,237

130 DATA 176,62, 1 1 ,50,2,32,205, 198, 0,33, 0,251, 3*, 51, 32

1*0 DATA 33,0, 1, 3*, *9, 32, 205, 20 1,0,58,100,0,251,201,0

150 DATA 0,0,2*3,0,205,98,0,33,

126, 189, 17 160 DATA 3*, 32, 1 , 10,0,237 , 176,6

2,11, 50, 2, 32, 205, 20* , 0 170 DATA 33,0,251 ,3*, 51 ,32,33,0

, 1, 3*, *9, 32, 205, 207,0

180 DATA 58,100,0,251 ,201 ,0,0,1 12, 99, 10*, 101, 115, 115,*6,67, 120, 28,0,0,0,0,0,0,0

200 STOP

9000 PRINT USR 100: SAVE "chess. B1"

LOA

D <S SAVE code from "chess-09'^

*2892

C9

RET

-+*2893

3EFF

LD

A, 255

*2895

1 18012

LD

DE, *736

*2898

DD2100A8

LD

IX, *3008

*2902

37

SCF

*2903

CD9DA7

CALL

*2909

*2906

FDE1

POP

IY

*2908

C9

RET

U2909

1*

INC

D

*2910

08

EX

AF , AF '

*291 1

15

DEC

D

*2912

F3

DI

*2913

3E0F

LD

A, 15 (25*), A

*2915

D3FE

OUT

-> *29I7

CD6205

CALL

1378

*2920

FB

EI

*2921

C9

RET

*2922

CDCDA7

CALL

*2957

U2925

DD2100FB

LD

IX, 6*256

*2929

1 10001

LD

DE, 256

*2932

3EFF

LD

A, 255

->*293*

CDC60*

CALL

1222

*2937

FDE1

POP

IY

U2939

C3CDA 7

JP

U2957

*29*2

JEFF

LD

A, 255

U29**

DD2100FB

LD

IX, 6*256

*29*8

1 10001

LD

DE, 256

*2951

37

SCF

U2952

CD9DA7

CALL

*2909

U2955

FDE1

POP

IY

*2957

21 OOF B

LD

HL, 6*256

*2960

7E

LD

A, (HL)

U2961

EEFE

XOR

25*

*2963

77

LD

( HL),A

*296*

2C

INC

L

U2965

20F9

JR

NZ, U2960

U2967

C9

RET

- IJPS

A few days ago I came across something which not everyone is aware of. Sometimes when the write-protect tab is broken off the side of a cartridge, we place a small piece of tape across the gap to enable us to write to the cartridge. This is OK, but only up to a point, as we usually take an address label or Scotch tape to put across the gap, this is NOT OK. This is the wrong type of tape ! ! ! I have noticed on occasion that a cartridge would behave in a strange manner, and in many cases I noted that this was caused by the tape not standing up to the pressure of the small spring in the drive. The tape had got a little warm and had slipped.

Also, when replacing the label on a diskette, I noticed there was a lot of residue left on the disk. If some of this goo gets onto the inside of the disk envelope, then it can get onto the face of the disk, from there to the heads, and all your disks get contaminated. Expensive.

So I went to my local stationary supply store, Grand & Toy in Burlington, and spoke to Dave Wolsey, the manager of that store, and I got some real good answers.

It would appear that plastic gives off an oily substance and this substance attacks the adhesive used in ordinary labels, causing the adhesive to deteriorate over a short period of time, and become very soft.

Have you noticed the manufacturers labels sticks real good? sometimes too good? That label is made for the job. The ordinary label is made to stick to paper, a different thing from plastic.

Grand & Toy sell a label specifically made for diskettes, which will work, and when removed will leave no residue. The labels for 5 1/4 are in boxes of 30. :ost S3. 95, or 10 box lot for $37.00. The label for ; 1/2 disks are in boxes of 25 for $6.59 or $30.30 for 5 boxes. 5 colours in each box.

Not expensive for the trouble saved.

What we need in this business is good old stick-ability

Bits A Pieces

Had soae letters froa eeebers Mho were having trouble with their newly acquired disk drives not operating as they should. The problea was no foroat no load and various other little things. One of those aeibers did soae checking on his disk por supply, and discovered the 12volt source w. running about 13.5, and the 5v source about 6.7 v. Last I heard ua that he did soae adjusting and things Mere a 1' better. I passed this on to sDteone else, \ lave not heard back froa hie yet.

Seeas the 'Met ?gland QL User 6roupa is off and running. Peter rale at the hela. Best of luck folks. Peter says that they are going to print a prograaae listing in their newsletter each issue, and if you don't want to go to the hassle of typing it in for yourself, send a US dollar, and they Mill send a disk all ready to go. Sounds a good idea. (This offer for HEHBERS ONLY) This group is dedicated to the QL. That is OHLY the QL. They already have a couple of dozen aeibers. Bood for a start.

It Mould appear that soae of the eissing QL's are coaing to the surface. If you sent anything to Toa Bent and did not get it back, contact Paul Holagren and he light just be able to help you. Seeas that Paul bought up all Tois stuff, (tight be worth a call to Paul. Jeff Taylor our editor, says he thinks his QL has been found.

I hope the neu publisher of UPDATE can coae up Miti. better delivery than we have recently had. This is August 7 I Mrite this, and I ai still waiting for the July issue. Not really good enough. I Mill wait and see hoM long it takes to coae before I renew. I Mas not at Milwaukee but froi what I hear going around, there Mere a feM unhappy folks that Sharps were absent. Next year the show Mill be in Chicago, at least that is what I heard. Coae on Hark, lake a shoMing. 1 Mill try and get to that one; so on that basis alone it would be profitable for you to attend.

The QL Library has had soie really nice eaterial added this last couple of lonths. Howard Clase in Newfoundland has sent in quite a few iteis, lots of Founts, and a lot of SuperBasic Procedures. Also he sent in a disk full of interesting stuff froi Enanuel Verbeeck of Belgiui. One of those iteis is IMA6IX, Mhich is a graphic reproducing systei. It even lakes the EYE-Q nage look better. I think this aust be oriented to the JS version rather than our JSU, as there are a couple of unor bugs, but nothing to detract froi the prograi to any great extent. QL'ers need this one.

H.H.

H.H.H.

ZX81 TAPE LIBRARY by G. Chambers Our ZX81 /TS1000 tape library does not see much activity these days. Parly, I suppose it's because the more active members have moved onto the TS2068 and the QL. However, it may also be because of an unawareness of the treasures that our tape I ibrary holds.

The following two listings are taken from tape If 65. They are loading utilities. The first one is for use on a tape program which crashes during loading. It may be from a flaw on the tape, for example. The program will allow you to salvage that part of the program which has loaded prior to the "break" in the tape.

1 REM E82A0CU-037ED522A0CU-0380 AE80 1 00003E76EDB92323C3030*

10 REM SAVE PART OF A BAD TAPE

20 FAST

30 LET a=12H

UO FOR 1=508 TO 929

50 POKE I+A*256,PEEK I

60 NEXT I

70 LET B=A*256+83i*

80 POKE B,55 90 POKE B+7,A+3

100 POKE B+32,6

1 10 POKE B+33,A+2

120 POKE B+38tA+3

130 POKE B+60,A+3

mO POKE B+6U,A+1

150 FOR J=1 TO 25

160 LET C=16512+J*2

170 POKE J+A*256+517,(PEEK C-28 )*16+PEEK (C+1 )-28

180 NEXT J

190 RANDOMIZE USR B

200>PRINT "THIS PROGRAM WILL RE COVER A DAMAGED TAPE FROM TH

E BEGINNING OF A PROGRAM TO THE DAMAGED SPOTOR DROPOUT.

220 PRINT "RUN PROGRAM", , , , "WHE N PATTERN APPEARS ,",""" LOAD" " TH E DAMAGED TAPE AS YOU WOULD A NO RMAL TAPE"

The second program is for use in making a copy of a tape which starts running automat ica 1 1 y after the load is complete. Customar i I y these programs cannot otherw ise be broken. Well, I say they cannot be broken; the knowledgeable among us know that you can stop such a program by getting into the FAST mode, then doing a RAND USR 832 (or RAND USR 836). However, this program will do a SAVE as well.

1 REM E 1 CDBB02E82 1 FDF8A 7 EDS 22 0FU2 1 DB04C3FC02000000000000

10 REM SAVE A SELF-RUN PROGRAM

20 FAST

30 LET A=12*

HO FOR 1=508 TO 929

50 POKE I+A*256,PEEK I

60 NEXT I

70 LET B=A*256+83U

80 POKE B,55

90 POKE B+7,A+3 100 POKE B+32,6 110 POKE B+33,A+2 120 POKE B+38,A+3 130 POKE B+60,A+3 li+O POKE B+6U,A+1 150 FOR J=1 TO 25 160 LET C=16512+J*2 170 POKE J+A * 256+5 17 , ( PEEK C-28 )*16+PEEK (C+1 )-28 180 NEXT J 190 PRINT USR B

200 PRINT "THIS PROGRAM WILL SA VE PROGRAMS THAT CANNOT BE BROKE N INTO. PSION CHESS, FOR EX

AMPLE. "

210 PRINT ,,,,"RUN PROGRAM.", , " WHEN PATTERN APPEARS, PLAY THE UNSAVEABLE PROGRAM" 220 PRINT ,,"THE SCREEN WILL GO

BLANK INSERT A FRESH TAP

E PUSH RECORD BUTTON

. . \\ PRESS ""S"" TO SAV

E"

FORMER CAMBRIDGE SALESMAN TRIES DATABASE FOR MAIL ORDERS

Nigel Searle, who prev ious I y represented the Z-88 laptop computer from Cambridge North America, has begun offering a database of ma i I -order bargains to anyone willing to pay one percent of the price quoted.

His company, The Marketing Clinic, says the philosophy is simple: if you don't save, you don't pay. The service for PC or PC peripheral buyers is available on weekdays, from 9am to 6pm, Eastern Standard Time, at 603-357-1061 . The number for Macintosh buyers is 603-352-9636.

Searle explains how the new service, called Best Buys, works. "You call me with the product you're seeking. I quote a price, and ask if you are interested. If you say No Thanks, that's the end of the conversat ion. If you are interested, you give me your credit card number and I tell you where it's available. You can ask add it ional quest ions and back out earl ier. "

Searle adds he may offer the service on a 900 number, if volume justifies it. "If we get enough volume we'll move to a 900 number and a totally interact ive system. There's a reason 900 numbers are used for tel ev is ion offers. It's a $1,000 per month minimum charge.".

Searle also mentioned the sad tale of what happened to the Z-88, a 1 -pound, non-DOS compat ible laptop with a foam rubber keyboard users could take to the beach. "Cambr idge North America's parent, D ivers i f i ed Foods, got into financial difficulties and the banks went after Cambr idge to repay those loans because it was the only prof itable part of the business", Searle says. "CNA late last year filed Chapter It bankruptcy to protect itself from it's parent company ' s bank, and they continue to operate under Chapter 11, selling the Z-88. But you may have noticed very little advert is ing because they are very tight on cash they're giving it to the bank. Meanwhile there's a new distributor based in New York, called the Cambr idge Group, just beg inn ing to import the Z-88, and sell it." So the story of 'he Z-88 isn't over it's just entered a new chapter.

For more informat ion, you can contact: Nigel Searle, The Marketing Clinic. The phone number is 603-352-9836. Check it out, maybe he will be able to find that special something that you were looking for and weren't able to find. You never know what he has on his database , if you don't give him a try first.

from The Hacker of Las Vegas

HINTS AND TIPS ON QL'S by E.P. Wannum

For those just getting rami I with the QL I offer the two following bits «f advice for you to try. Once you are familiar with them you will be ready use them and have fun. To the degree that you make progress at a hobby it win remain fun.

(1) Screen saving on the QL is easy, but it uses 32K of storage on disk or mdv to do so. The screen starts at memory address $20000 (131072) and finishes at $27FFF (163839). The easiest way to save to MDV is to have the command SBYTES mdvl picture, 131072, 32768 in your screen design program. To get back ( load) the picture you execute the statement MBYTES mdvl _picture, 131072. The ™me"P,cntuhr*an. is used only as an example and eat i £ 9 any name that you wish. What is a SCREEN? When you look at a picture on Y°ur monitor, from top to bottom, and eft to right, then you are looking at a screen.

(2) The DIR command will take a channel number assigned t-o it, such as Dir*2, MDV1_file. This will list the directory information of the MDV on channel two. The DIR command is J'*''™\ to the CAT (catalog) command that TS206U Oliger users are used to. You can «J« this to compare two directories that re fairly long by listing on different channels, rather than the first /'«•■'* being displaced by the second. Then you can do a look-see and check for any

d ifferences.

Retyped from the Indiana Sinclair-Time Newsletter

QUILL mnd TOOLKIT_2

Back in tbt Hay/tot of SIK-UK, I nation* tha problee of using QUILL in as ua-expaaded QL ehee TK2 is installed.

Since than I have had a couple of contents aboat Quill failing to load, and asking aa for a claaa copy of Quill. It tuned out that TK2 had racaotly bean initallad, and that uai uben tha trouble bad started.

Tha syeptoes are this. You load up frill, fettiag the coaoand uindou aloof the top of the screen, then the QL sake* a point to Microdrive 12, and display on the screen t- Unable to start QUI 11 Press SPACE to continue Press ESC to abandon QUILL Loading is halted at this point.

The other night I was speaking to Peter Hale about this and that and other things, and I aentioned this probleo to hie, and the first Question he asked his If I aas loading froa 12 drive. I said froa tl. Then he asked if I had a cartridge in 12 drive, of course I had to say NO.. AHA says Peter, thats your problee, and then uent on to explain.

aa all knou, QUILL takes up a lot of eeeory, ahich is one of its greatest draebacks. aa have all, I aa sure, been in the niddle of a docueent or letter and had the drives start up to create a OEFJHP file, aost annoying.

This is what aas happening ahen aa tried to load Quill and TK2. TK2 takes up soaa eeeory, just enough that there is no rooe for QUILL, so it tries to create a OEFJHP file on drive 12, and as there

is no cartridge In 12, QUILL closes down.

So you CAN use QUILL and TK2 in an unexpended QL, provided that you have a cartridge in drive 12 to hold the OEFJHP file.

I wonder hoe this affects the Networking? ahich is hoe all this chatter started up. I guess that this should perait us to neteork QUILL on an unexpended unit, snen I get tiae I aill try it, in tha aeantine soaeone else eight care to have a go and let us knoa the results. Hoa about it soaeone out there.

Hugh Hoaie.

MULTIPLICATION ACCURACY WITH THE ZX81 by G. Chambers

As the Sinclair manual states, the ZX81 can multiply with an 8-digit accuracy.

The following program will allow you to multiply two integers of any ( pract ical ) length with absolute accuracy.

30 INPUT X$ UO INPUT Y$

50 DIM A( LEN X$ + LEN Y$ ) 60 FOR M = LEN X$ TO 1 STEP- I 70 FOR M = LEN Y$ TO 1 STEP -t 80 LET C = M + N 90 LET B * JAL X$(M)

100 LET A(C) = VAL Y$( N ) * B + A( C ) 110 LET I = INT A(C) - (I * 10) 120 LET A(C) = A(C) - (I * 10) 130 LET A(C-1 ) = A(C-1 ) * I 1*0 NEXT N 150 NEXT M 160 CLS

170 PRINT X$; "X"; Y$; " = "; 180 PRINT

190 FOR P = 2 TO (LEN X$ * LEN Y$ ) 200 PRINT A(P) 210 NEXT P 220 STOP

PRINTER INK by G Chambers

I merit ioned a source pf printer ink in t last newsletter. This prompted a respons from one of our members, Mac Pace. He wr ites:

Dear George, Received my July-Aug SINC-LINK this AM, and noticed your remark on printer ink.

Computer Friends, Inc. 1 U250 N.W. Sciences Park Dr. Portland, OR 97229 (503) 626-2291

A good supplier of ink as well as cartridges and lots of stuff. Ink is $2. per 2oz. I have several different ribbor of dif colors, these people are a good source.

Also have you heard of EBONIZE Ink spray, it does a pretty good job.

UPWEGO COMPUTER SUPPLY, INC 120 West Madison St., Chicago, IL 60602

$1^.95 for spray can good for 20 ribbom

Yours very truly,

Mac Pace.

PLOTTING CHARTS and CURVES on the T/S 204-0

in this demons t show how the T/o running ma te , the accept 12 INPUT v vert them into a Chart or a Point Routine "D-17" xs q r am for the bar r,D-19" is a s i mi l the point-to -poin can enter any 12 in practice, home amounts would be same magnitude, t reasonable I o o k.

ration we w i I l 2068 and its

T/S 204-0, can a lues and con- up ft i ca l Ba r to Point Curve* the basic pro- chart and ar program for t curve . You dollar amounts, ver . these o f a bou t the hus presenting i n q figure.

a

on m difference be- two routines is in lines 208 to 240.

About the tween these the area of

Therp is another feature to the routines that adds to then utility. Th e progr ams are written so that the output x* sent to the T/S 204© pnntei , with both the upper and lower half continuously and automatic- ally copied. Thus they are blended into a single illu*t t i o n .

Now I wonder how many other more sophisticated computer- printer combinations can match this effectiveness and simpli- city of providing a ha - d copy of similar data, with a b??i!:c^ program that is readily altered to suit ones needs?

Uarren Fr i c Ke , UNY user Group

5 REM 4* MODEL OF R UERTICLE BAR CHART. ict PFM ** "D-17". 2-10-^S, UP DRflU 0,175? DRRU 255,0: DRR

U 2a~PRINT RT 1,4;"** SALES Of D Q-DRDS ; RT 3, l; "MONTH" , "DOLLR

R°50 DIM a $(30): DIM Si 12) 60 FOR n=l TO 12 70 INPUT "Enter sales, month n o . " ; in) ; " s in)

30 PRINT RT 4+n , 3 ; n , s '. n j 35 NEXT n 90 LET max=0 100 FOR n =1 TO 12 110 IF s(n)>max THEN LET max=s<.

n 5

120 NEXT n

130 LET rnin=fr *x

150 iPVinhmiV^THEN let min=si

111 p'IintV 13, l; "Highest Mont h = "; max ;RT 19, l; "Lowest Month

=130mpRINT RT 20, l; "Have PRINTER ready, and p ress ; RT gl, 1, ENT

ER if data is UK. : .JNPU T >- * 190 PRINT RT H0 , 1 . d $ , RT ^ 1 , ± , a g.

pnPY n I 3 _ 202 PRINT AT 6,1; "DOLLARS" RT B

'ii^PRiNT *f«>"l?"MONTH J F M

P f-i ,i . ! P 0 N D " 207 PLOT 17. D = RU S^|c0.lf= 210 FOR r 7 TO