SINC-LINK

Vol.7 No. 5 Sept-Oct '89

SINC-LINK IS A PUBLICATION OF THE TORONTO TIMEX -SINCLAIR USERS CLUB AND IS ISSUED 6 TIMES A YEAR. COPIES OF THE NEWSLETTER ARE $1.50 EACH FOR NON-MEMBERS. CLUB MEMBERS RECEIVE FREE COPIES AS PART OF THE $20. 00 ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP FEE. A NEWSLETTER SUBSCRIPTION ONLY IS AVAILABLE FOR $12.00.

NEWSLETTERS ARE EXCHANGED, FREE OF CHARGE, WITH OTHER TIMEX-SINCLAIR USERS GROUPS.

PLEASE CREDIT THIS PUBLICATION AND THE AUTHOR IF YOU COPY MATERIAL.

THE CLUB MEETS ON THE FIRST WEDNESDAY OF EACH MONTH AT FOREST HILLS COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE, 730 EGLINTON AVE. W. , TORONTO.

SEND CORRESPONDANCE TO:

Attention: SINC-LINK TORONTO TIMEX-SINCLAIR CLUB, 14 RICHOME

SCARBOROUGH, ONTARIO, CANADA M1K 2Y1

EDITOR USERS COURT,

ZX8I/ZZ81 TS1MI/15I8 PC83M TS2I68 SPKTRIII

UBKH 1/7

mam Tim-siicuiB

BEERS CUD

SUPER

FALL

ISSUE

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS :

PRESIDENT TREASURER SECRETARY ACTIVITIES: TAPE LIBRARIAN ZXSi: TAPE LIBRARIAN 2068: TAPE LIBRARIAN QL: PAPER LIBRARIAN: NEWSLETTER: LIAISON OFFICER: ( Out-of-town members )

JEFF TAYLOR ( 896-4712 ) BILL LAWSON ( 444-8772 ) GEORGE CHAMBERS ( 751-7559 )

RENE BRUNEAU ( 531-9749 )

'i ii ii

RENATO ZANNESE ( 635-6536 )

HUGH HOWIE ( 634-4929 )

GREG ROBINS ( 920-7747 )

JEFF TAYLOR ( 896-4712 )

GEORGE CHAMBERS, 14 RICHOME COURT

SCARBOROUGH, ONTARIO, M1K 2Y1

( 416-751-7559 )

TORONTO TIMEX-SINCLAIR USERS CLUB

14 RICHOME COURT, SCARBOROUGH, ONTARIO, CANADA M1K 2Y1

NEWSLETTER

Well, another year has passed and it's time for club Executive nominations and elections. After a year as V.P. and this year as president I think it's time for someone else to assume the reins. Not that I haven't enjoyed my years in office but I feel that some other person should take the position and put forward his ideas to keep this club growing. And growing it is! We have a larger club membership than we've had for years and our bank balance is the biggest it's ever been. Something must be going right.

I feel that I could have done a lot more for the club if I had devoted more time to organizing and prodding. That's what a good president is supposed to do - motivate other people to do the work. I'm afraid I don't motivate as well as I'd like to.

Luckily, the club has some people who are motivated without my help and they are the ones who help to keep this club afloat. Naturally, I would like to thank the current club Executive for donating their time and efforts to their various positions. I would especially like to single out the accomplishments of two Exec members .

First, to George Chambers for almost single-handedly taking care of the day-to-day running of the club, the disk library creation and maintenance, the management of the out-of-town members, the responding to piles of mail and requests for information. the all-hours troubleshooting help and the open-door hospitality. Make no mistake about it. George is the club. Thanks, George, really.

Second, to Hugh Howie for literally bringing the QL section of the club back from the dead. A few choice words spurred him into action and the Qlers are enjoying a liveliness never before seen in the club. Way to go, Hughie.

Now for the bad news. I'm staying on as newsletter editor. I'm sorry, but yes, you'll have to continue to read my prose. Assembling this paper id something I enjoy and is my contribution to keeping this club afloat. Since we continue to enjoy a good influx of articles I must assume that at least I am able to motivate those club members who write.

I can't claim all the glory for making Sine-Link * the publication it is, though. A newsletter is only as good as the articles and programs in it, so I would like to show my appreciation. Thanks to Bill, Bob, George, Hugh, Lou C, Lou L., Renato, Rene and all the the writers from in-town and out who help to make this one of the best Timex-Sinclair newsletters on the continent.

One last note of thanks goes to Bill Jones of Update magazine for continually plugging Sine-Link in his fine missive. We have received many inquiries and new members thanks to his work. Update is an excellent source of information for QL, TS2068 and Z88 users and is well worth the subscription price. Update is (to my knowledge) the only TS magazine still in production after the demise of Quantum Levels and Syncware News ( Time Designs where are you?). Bill's address is on a following page.

TIPPIT

Tom Bent is a leading expert on the OL as well as president of the CATS group and past publisher of Quantum Levels. He expects to be in the Toronto area sometime in October and I have asked if he would give a seminar on the QL. which he has consented to do. If you are interested in attending please let us know so we have an idee, of how many members plan to attend.

SINC-LINK

J.T.

2068

BOB'S NOTEBOOK

Have you priced those planning calendars you buy from your local stationer? Well, if you have a wide printer of the dot matrix type, you can make your own personalized calendar and save a bundle.

This program should be typed in carefully, watching the spacing of any stuff inside the quotation marks and DATA statements. Here are some explanatory notes for some of the 1 i nes :

Lines Details

ISO As usuai you may have to change 237 to suit

your TS2068. Find your correct value by using a simple FOR . . . NEXT loop to get the IN 127 response from your computer.

FOR i = i TO 100

PRINT IN 127

NEXT i

230 40 minus signs

260 Enter the four digits of the year, eg, 1990

320-530 Calculates each man th ' s- calendar .

550 Sets the printer to print elongated characters.

Check your manual for correct commands needed

to carry out this function. 720 Turns the elongated characters OFF.

820-860 Handles the DATA for the names of the months.

Substitute other languages here, too.

100 REM Bob Mitchell 1989 110 REM ======================

120 REM MAKE A CALENDAR ON THE

WIDE PRINTER

GO TO 210 TO SET

NEW YEAR.

140 REM CHANGE LINE 580 TO

PERSONALIZE THE CALENDAR

160 BEEP .1,4: BEEP .1,0

170 , RETURN

180 IF IN 127 0 237 THEN GO TO 180

190 RETURN

200 GO TO 280

210 REM initialize

220 LET f=0

230 LET l$=u ..

240 DIM a$ ( 12,9) 250 GO SUB 820

260 INPUT "year? (yyyy) ";year

270 LET g=280: DIM d(31): DIM d*<31, 12,28)

280 CLS

285 LET y=year

290 CLOSE #2 '

300 PRINT AT 10,4;MMake a Calendar for " ;y 310 GO SUB 160

320 INPUT "Enter Month (1 TO 12)u;m

330 LET d=l: LET mon=m: LET year=y: LET f =1 : DIM a (42)

SINC-LINK

340 IF f=0 THEN GO TO 250 350 LET end=30

360 IF m=l OR m=3 OR m=5 OR m=7 OR m=S OR m=10 OR m=12 THEN LET end=31

370 IF m=2 THEN LET end=2S 3S0 LET leap=0

390 IF y/4=INT <y/4) AND y/lOOOINT (y/100) THEN LET leap=l 400 IF y/400=IMT (y/400) THEN LET leap=l 410 IF m=2 AND leap=l THEN LET end=29 420 IF m=l OR m=2 THEN LET m=m+12 430 IF m=13 OR m=14 THEN LET y=y-l

440 LET r=d+2*m+2+INT ( < 3*m+3 ) /5 > +INT (y/4)+y-INT (y/100)+INT (y/400)

450 LET nufT.= (r/7-INT (r/7))*7

460 LET num=INT (num+.5)

470 LET start=nurr.

480 IF num=0 THEN LET start=7

490 LET day=l

500 FOR p=stai-t TO 42

510 LET a(p)=day

520 LET day=day+l

530 NEXT p

540 CLS

550 GO SUB 180: OUT 127,27: GO SUE ISO : OUT 127,87: GO SUB 180: OUT 127,49 570 LPRINT " "

580 LPRINT TAB 12; "PLANNING CALENDAR" 590 LPRINT

600 LPRINT TAB 13 ; a* ( mon ) ; " ";year

610 LPRINT 1$'" SUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT"

620 LPRINT 1$

630 FOR r=0 TO 5

640 FOR c=l+r*7 TO 7+r*7

650 LET cc=c-r*7

660 IF a<c)=0 THEN PRINT TAB <5*cc)?" ";: GO TO 690

670 IF a(c) end THEN PRINT TAB <5*cc>;" ";: GO TO 690

680 LPRINT TAB < 5*cc ) ; a ( c > ;

690 NEXT c

700 LPRINT ' ' " 1$

710 NEXT r

720 GO SUB 180: OUT 127,27: GO SUB ISO : OUT 127,87: GO SUB 180: OUT 127,48 760 PRINT #l;AT 0,0; "more? y/n" 770 GO SUB 160

780 IF INKEY$=" " THEN PAUSE 0

790 IF INKEY$=" y " THEN4 GO TO 280

SOO IF INKEY$=" n " THEN* RANDOM I ZE USR 100: NEW

810 GO TO 780

820 RESTORE

830 FOR i=l TO 12

840 READ r$: LET a$(i)=r$: NEXT i 850 RETURN 860 DATA

"JANUARY" , "FEBRUARY" , " MARCH" , "APRIL" , "MAY" , "JUNE" , "JULY" , "AUGUST " , "SEPTEMBER" , "OCTOBER" , " NOVEMBER" , "DECEMBER"

870 RANDOMIZE USR 100: SAVE "calndr.B2" LINE 890

880 STOP

890 RANDOMIZE USR 100: OPEN #3," lp" 900 RANDOMIZE USR 100: POKE 16094,0 910 GO TO 280

SINC-LINK

2068

PS. Sorry. You'll have to drain in your own vertical lines on the calendar .

Eob Mitchell Willowdale Ontario M2J 2L2 890815

Here is a miniature version made by entering OUT 127,15 before running the program.

PLANNING CALENDAR JANUARY 1990

SUN

MON

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

SAT

1

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

io

1 1

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

23

24

25

26

27

30 31

SINC-LINK

5

w iKcmuci a

The attached program has been translated by L. Laferr iere from a prograe by R.Gagnon and published in Issue #7 of OL_DOC. The purpose is to display the french characters on the screen. ( not the printer , just the screen -for now , the printer will follow next. ). I will give Hugh Howie a disk with the SuperBasic listing which I called keyboard_bas . Then the resulting exec which is called CLAVIER_EXE to stay with R.Gagnon designation. There is also a modified copy of boot for QUILL. The program CLAVIEP_EXE must be loaded nn the same disk with QUILL. The procedure to get the accents for the french characters depends on a two key operation.

After the program is running to get the e with the accent you have to press the apostrophe then the e . To get the other accent you enter the pound sign. To get the soft c you enter the upper case of the pound sign.

Remember in most cases you need to enter two characters. e.g. the apostrophe, the quote mark or the little hat, on upper case 6. You can still get the signs , ' by entering the apostrophe , or quote mark twice.

Confusing ?

L. Laferr i re

Hello, Emily. This is Gladys Murphy up the street. Fine, thanks ... Say, could you go to your window and describe what's in my front yard?"

100

no

120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 210 220 230 240

260 270 290 290 300 310 320 330 340 350 360 370 380 390 400 410 420 430 440 450 460 470 480 490 500 510 520 530 540 550 560 570 580 590 600 610 620 630 640 650 660 670 680

REMark Creating a File CLAVIER_EXE CLS

INPUT "Where to save CLAVIER_EXE (e.g. mdvl_) ?" , save* IF LEN(save*>=0: save*="f lp 1_" PRINT " One moment please. "

RESTORE 300: a=RESPR ( 1000) :basr=a

count=0

REPeat 1

IF EOF: EXIT 1

AT 3,0: PRINT ">

READ x: POKE a,x : a=a+l

AT 3,0: PRINT " <";

count=count+l END REPeat 1

PRINT "Press any key to save CLAVIER_EXE. " : PAUSE SEXEC save*&"CLAVIER_EXE",basr, count, 128

DATA 96,12,0,0,0,0,74,251,0,4

DATA 67,81,48,53, 112,11,114,255, 116,1

DATA 78,65,67,250, 1,22, 18,25, 12, 1

DATA 0,42, 103,0,0, 10,97,0,0,200

DATA 96,0,255,240,22,57,0,2, 123, 139

DATA 12,3,0,39,103,0,0,38,12,3

DATA 0,34, 103,0,0,46, 12,3,0,94

DATA 103,0,0,54, 12,3,0,96, 103,0

DATA 0,92, 12,3,0, 126, 103,0,0, 100

DATA 96,0,0, 160,97,0,0, 124,97,0

DATA 0, 104,67,250,6, 162,96,0,0,34

DATA 97,0,0, 108,97,0,0,88,67,250

DATA 0,156,96,0,0,18,97,0,0,92

DATA 97,0,0,72,67,250,0, 152,96,0

DATA 0,2, 16,25, 176,60,0,42, 103,0

DATA 255, 150, 176,3, 102,0,255,242,97,0

DATA 0,60, 18, 17,97,0,0,72,96,0

DATA 255, 130,97,0,0,46, 18,60,0, 131

DATA 97,6,0,56,96,0,255, 114,97,0

DATA 0, 30. 18,60,0, 136,97,0,0,40

DATA 96,0,255,98,22,57,0,2, 128, 139

DATA 12,3,0,0, 103, 0,255, 244, 78, 1 17

DATA 19,252,0,0,0,2,128,139,18,60 .

DATA 0, 194,97,0,0,4,78, 117,36, 121

DATA 0,2, 128, 76,48, 120,0,224,78, 144

DATA 78, 117, 112,8. 114,255, 118,5, 147,201

DATA 78,65,96,0,255,36, 101, 144,97, 141

DATA 117, 154,39,39,42,42, 101, 143, 105, 146

DATA 117, 135, 1 1 1 , 132, 34, 34, 42, 42, 101, 145

DATA 97, 142, 117, 155, 105, 149, 111, 152,94,94

DATA 42,42,82,69,77,97,114,107,32,62

DATA 62,32,67, 108,97, 118, 105, 101, 114,32

DATA 81, 117, 131,98, 131,99, 111, 105, 115,32

DATA 97,99, 116, 105, 102,32, 118, 101, 114, 115

DATA 105, 111, 110,32,48,46,53,32,32, 131

DATA 99, 114, 105, 1 16, 32, 1 12, 97, 1 14, 32, 82

DATA 131,97, 108,32,71,97, 103, 110, 111, 110

DATA 44,32,77, 1 1 1 , 1 10, 1 16, 1 14, 131,97, 108

DATA 32,56,56,10,42,0,0,0

Don't nake a nonkev out

SINC-LINK

ivw awwiii supwrtins II and Iffl, feature Grvfcics. <mm3-47l3 mnm^m baud, a kotrs a m

ZAttl

Here is a revised schematic of the DIGInDUBBER that was in the last issue of SINCrjLINK. This one includes 3 diodes that were inadvertently left out of the last tracing. Sorry about that.

DIGInDUBBER

by Fred Nachbaur March 1989

Retraced by G.F.C.

PARTS LIST CI - 270 pf. disc C2 - .04? uf. disc D1.D3 1N4148 or 1N9140 Rl - 47 ohms, 1/4 watt R2,R3,R6 - 1000 ohms, 1/4 watt R4 - 10K ohm, 1/4 watt R5 - 180K ohm, 1/4 watt SI - SPOT slide or toggle Tl - 500 ohm CT to 8 Ohm audio

output transformer 3 minis jacks or plugs with cable Perfrjboard

Use DIGI-DUBBER to make high quality duplicates of ZX81/TS1000/TS1500 tapes. Wire it up on a small piece of perf- board or other support. MONITOR jack optional.

2068

1 REM Super Scroll by Steven V. Gunhouse

2 CLEAR 84767: LET x=64768

4 PRINT AT 10,5;"Loadlng M/L..."

5 LET a=10: LET b-ii: LET c=12: LET d=13: LET e = 14: LET f=15 10 READ «S: IF a$*"END" THEN GO TO 70

20 FOR n=l TO 15 STEP 2

30 LET w*16*VAL a«<n)+VAL a$<n + l)

40 POKE x,w: LET x=x+l

SO NEXT n

60 GO TO 10

70 CLEAR : LET scroll=64820: LET right = 64768: LET top=64769: LET left = 64770: T bottoa=84771: LET xdlr = 64772: LET ydlr=64773 80 PRINT "Window Micro-scroll routine"

90 FOR 1 = 100 TO 103: PLOT 1,4: DRAW 0,151: NEXT 1: FOR 1 = 152 TO 155: PLOT 1,4 )RAW 0,151: NEXT 1: FOR 1 = 4 TO 7: PLOT 100,1: DRAW 55,0: NEXT i: FOR 1 = 152 TO 5: PLOT 100,1: DRAW 55,0: NEXT 1: REM Frame

00 FOR 1 = 105 TO 108: PLOT 1,9: DRAW 0,141: NEXT 1: FOR 1 = 125 TO 129: PLOT 1,9

)RAW 0,141: NEXT i: FOR 1 = 147 TO 150: PLOT 1,9: DRAW 0,141: NEXT 1

05 FOR 1 = 9 TO 12: PLOT 105,1: DRAW 45,0: NEXT 1: FOR 1 = 147 TO 150: PLOT 105,1

)RAW 45,0: NEXT 1: FOR 1 = 79 TO 82: PLOT 105,1: DRAW 45,0: NEXT 1

10 POKE left, 104: POKE right, 151: POKE xdir,0: POKE ydir,l: FOR 1=8 TO 76: PO

top,i + 74: POKE bottom, 1: RANDOMIZE USR scroll: NEXT 1 20 POKE xdlr.l: POKE ydlr.O: POKE bottom, 8: POKE top,151: FOR 1=1 TO 48: RAND IZE USR scroll: NEXT 1

30 POKE left.O: POKE right, 159: POKE top,159: POKE bottoa.O: POKE xdir,255: P J E ydlr,255: FOR 1=1 TO 160: RANDOMIZE USR scroll: NEXT 1 50 REM This routine will scroll any section of screen any direction. 60 REM Variable naaes for POKEs should be self-explanatory. 70 REM Use POKE xdlr,255 to scroll left, POKE xdlr,l to scroll right. 75 REM Or POKE xdlr,0 for no horizontal scrolling. 80 REM Use POKE ydir,255 to scroll up, POKE ydlr,l to scroll down, 85 REM or POKE ydir.O for no vertical scrolling. 90 REM These can be combined for diagonal scrolls. 7 3 DATA "FFAF000001FF3A05"

Profit**

' 7>e>io

74 DATA "FD47545DFEFF3E07"

75 DATA "281424A4200A7DC6"

76 DATA "206F38047CD60867"

77 DATA "AFB8C0546DC9A425"

78 DATA "A7C07DD6206FD87C"

7 9 DATA "C60867C9ED5B00FD"

80 DATA "2A02FD7A94477BF6"

81 DATA "07951F1F1FE61F3C"

8 2 DATA "4F04C5ED4B04FD3E"

83 DATA "FFB8280162B92001"

84 DATA " 8BCB 3DCB 3DCB 3D 3 E"

85 DATA "AF9467E6380707B5"

86 DATA "6F7CCB3FCB3FCB3F"

87 DATA "ACE6F8ACF6406754"

9988 DATA "5D78A7C1280605C5"

9989 DATA "CD06FDC1 3A04FDFE"

9990 DATA "FF281CA72832C5E5"

9991 DATA "41A77E1F12132310"

9992 DATA "F9E1CD06FDC110EE"

9993 DATA "AF41121310FCC9C5"

9994 DATA "E541A77E17121B2B"

9995 DATA "10F9E1CD06FDC1 10"

9996 DATA "EEAF41121B10FCC9"

9997 DATA "C5E50600EDB0E1CD"

9998 DATA "08FDC110F3C90000"

9999 DATA "END"

SINC-LINK

2068

FROM MEMBERS LETTERS

Here are some excerpts from a letter from member Richard Hurd, about a 3 1/2 inch drive that he has been installing. Might be of interest to some of our other members. G.F.C.

To Quote:

I have the new NEC FD1035 working, a nice addition. But there mere a few problems I had to deal with in getting it up and going. You've added a 3.5" drive to your system haven't you? Well both the fd connector and the power connectors were different than the Tandon's or the AMSTRAD's. The fd connector is a IDC type, a IDS 34 (socket). The power supply connection is made with a 4 POSITION SINGLE ROW MODU housing and 4 contacts. The contacts do not come with the housing, they need to be ordered separate. Now here I got lucky, I looked in the Junk box and found a 10 position MODU connector with wires ready to go! I just pulled the 5th pin and trimmed off the excess. Although I would have worked something out without going with the MODU type connector. I clipped off the connector of a power supply "Y" connector and spliced in the new connector. The power supply pins were not defined in the included documentation or on the drive, so a toll-free call to TIMELINE and I received the power supply pin definitions. They are left to right, looking at the rear of the drive, right side up. +5, +5 return, +12 return, and £ +12. The power supply I am using has both +5 return and +12 ^ ^ U return on the same line with no problems. £ A ^

* w ^

I ordered the IDS 34 from JDR Microdevices (ad in Computer v> ^ g Shopper). The MODU connector is available from DIG I -KEY, 701 2 ry Brooks Ave South, P.O. Box 677, Thief River Falls, MN * * 4 56701-0677.

I've enclosed an updated utility disk with my RAM-DISK utility removed and Q2D added.

Something I would like to see is a modification of the LKDOS cartridge where the SPECTRUM ROM could be replaced with 16K of RAM and then a person could Just load in the SPECTRUM code or any other code. I have articles on how to do it without the LKDOS cartridge, but am not sure how to modify the cartridge. Do you know of anyone doing anything like this?

Here's a tip I picked up quite some time ago and only recently put to use. Full size printer ribbons can dry out. I am using a Smith-Corona D-100, and the last new ribbons I purchased were pretty dried out when I received them. Then I remembered that WD-40 will restore them. Use very little to start with and place the ribbon in a sealed plastic bag for a few days. The first one I sprayed well, I'll probably have to wait about six months for it to dry out enough to use. It works great.

8

SINC-LINK

ZX81

ON

To Comp Hon

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Ql

c

0

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+ 5v

Modu lator

t h t h c u o f

P o T5 d i

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The d i L ernffia iTi ono chr ■ignais single m o n i tor

0 u t . B uji th th to the bipolar

1 tells

p u u r modi 1 © 0 0 compu rect video There are g this, w o f comp lex sses the RF harper , cri l e is, a r " mus t noai easiest uu a is to g ome . ' fill are mu 1 1 i p w ire. Lea ' s guts to y doing tha e s imp lest compu te r : transistor the story.

n cation for ter has been output c i r - various way s i th varying ity. Basically

modu lator to s p e r displays, real, live be purchased, y around this

0 'composite— video and sync

1 e x e d into a ve it to the

sort t h em all t , uje are left of interfaces R single

stage. Figure

DIRECT VIDEO

for the TSieee

? + SVC-C

£ Rl

< 22-Ohn

TO ULfl Pin 1 6

G31

2H2222 \

■> To

Compos nonitor

A s you can see, all it t is an npn transistor and single current-limiting resi ail available at your l o Radio Shack. Other needed i include a phono jack, a s Lena th of shielded cable "twisted pair", solder, etc

Th e easy parts consist finding a suitable ground +SUDC connections. The tr part is to find the ULfl connection to pin is. luck all these spots are huddled to the modulator.

See the pictorial diagram Fig. 2 . Th is applies for

** X^SUE ONu" and 99 XwwUE THREE

a k es> a

s to r ca i terns ho r t o r

o f and i c fcy Chip i iy * next

o f bo th

flny 2N2222 or eqivalent can be used here. Because of the fact that the '* equivalents '* can have different to- configurations, a strictly 'generic' drawing of 01 has been provided, not conform- ing to any particular type. The heavy lines are those wires that connect the modulator into the computer. P Lease note that while there are three modulator uu i res , only the "top two " are being shown . This should help things when you try to match up the diagram with the real thing.

You may decide, as I have, to totally remove the modulator for a single, improved output. This idea came to me when mine bit the big one, one day. You can position a pc -mount phono jack right on' a large foil area left vacant beneath the old unit. Or, if you p fzr , leave it in and d r i v e your monitor and a TU set a t the s ame t i me .' I opted for o the r 1000 and it Stereo video on the there no end'?'? this route, you'll that short- length, er coax or " twisted - 01 to a suitable c o n - ide the computer. Now thin*, about strain the cable. so the ends off. Uhen I got to the decision was made y thing in a brand new case with a brand new keyboard and all wild cables were tap*d down. Ma u be you want to yank out that old modulator, after all.

By the way, this article was brought to you by Tech Draw Jr., Pixel Sketch and Graphics Editor snd Pixel Print Plus! The tsmon schematic can be downloaded from

thi s o n m y wo r ks g rea t .

TSIOOO! IS

If you go need to run s ma l l -d i ame t "• from or outs have to e f for

t twist

point, put ever

pa i

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you

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don

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to

the Challenger file name, "tsmon

It ' s bas i callu so you can treat second one has encoding in it,

Have fun !

BBS under " or "tsmon a SCREENS it as such addi tiona h owe v e r .

the cod " i le , The RLE

SINC-LINK

RAMBLINGS OF A CLUB MENBER 3 = QL

1 = MODEM

For a number of months I had been dilly dallying about my modems. The first one, the 2050 , didn't seem sophisticated enough, so I got the 212 from George /CIM I B/BELL . Of course it had 2 speeds , 300/1200. But to no avail, it might as weirl have been infinite speed , no luck. I was ready to throw in the towel when Bob Michel 1 suggested we might want to try again. So I agreed and hooked up the old reliable, read myriad instructions, and we tried our hands at "modeming" . After some bumbling on my part, we were able to make contact and exchange some greetings on the screen. Bob wasn't sastified until he was able to send me a program, which I received O.K. and saved it to disk. But when it came time for me to send him the same program back, I was all thumbs and speechless. Everything I tried did not work. However it was a partial success, we had "TALKED" to one another. Needless to say I was exhausted after that experience. So" I went back to all' the manuals, read countless instructions, each

different from the previous one, and then took my courage in both hands and called Bob again, and la and behold, GREAT BALLS OF FIRE, we were successful. t We could send and receive programs both ways .

1 real ly felt great ! ! ! !

2 .= ASSISTANCE

Another benefit of being a club member is all the assistance that is out there just waiting to be asked. As I was trying to connect my Star NX 1000 printer to my QL, the interface < serial to parallel ) would not function properly. Yet the printer worked fine off- line, what to do ? The people that I knew had a 0L and ser/par interface were all away. So eventually I called Ian Robertson to help me solve the problem by substitution, sure enough the trouble was in the interface and with his wide experience and knowledge had the problem fiVced in no time at all. Thanks Ian.

Did you know that if you have a SuperBasic program in your QL and a printer connected to SER1, that' yoi» can get a listing of your program, I entering , with your printer ON naturally ! SAVE SER1

That's all, and you get a listing of your program.

4 = QL_D0C

After trying, for some months to obtain the club copies of the QL_D0C without any luck, I finally decided to purchase the back issues from Real Gagnon, as well as getting a personal subscription to the magazine. Well worth it.

5 = Wealth of Information

There is a vast amount- of information available to us in the various libraries of the club. For instance, ZX 81 paper as well as program libraries. 2068/SPECTRUM again paper as well as cassette libraries. And now with the QL another rich source of material is accumulating. Why not follow th example of the large suppliers o. software, who sell catalog disks of their wares for $4 or $5 per disk.

They are usually only listings of the various programs with a short description of the goods. I know it means a lot of work to start the process but once the disks are done it only means regular updates and the benefits are unlimited.

Think about it ! ! ! ! Louis Laferriere 15 July 1989

FOR SALE! FOR SALE! FOR SALE!

1 - 3" AMDISK Dual Drive with

P/S and 20 3" disks - $120 1 - Tasnan Printer I/F - $40 1 - Zenith Green Monitor $80 1 - Sanyo B&W Monitor - $80

Contact: Greg Lloyd 127 Mammoth Hall Road, Scarborough, Ont. M1B 1P8 (416) 292-0348

10

SINC-LINK

2068

LW DISK UTILITY

DOUBLE TO QUAD

by Bi chard Hurd

PROGRRH LOGIC

Here is a little LKDOS utility for those who have 5.25" quad density (OD) drives but not the standard 5.25" double density (DD) drives, which most software is distributed on. D20 will convert a DO disk using your OD drive.

I started out with a pair of AMDEK 3" single sided (SS) DD drives then got around to adding a Tandon 5.25" double sided (D5) OD drive (TH 101-4A) . Which worked great for converting 5.25" 55 DD disks, find now that I have the problem of converting DD disks taken care of, I have added a 3.5" DS OD drive (NEC FD1035) . Which makes the conver- sion a snap.

PROGRRH INSTRUCTIONS

The utility is easy to use. Upon loading, the 118 bytes of code are placed in upper memory. Then you are prompted for which drives to use for source and destination. Two drives are highly recommended but the pro- gram will allow you to use one OD drive as the source and dest- ination drive and prompt you when to swap disks. To convert DS disks you will need a D5 OD drivels). The destination disk should be pre-formated for the destination drive.

As D20 is presented it is set up to convert all 80 tracks of a DD DS or SS disk. The value 79 in line 590 handles this. If you were to know which is the last used track on the DD disk, you could change the 79 to what the last used track is. This is recommended no matter what setup you use. It will put less wear and tear on the drives, and if you are using one OD drive, less hassel. In order to find which is the last used track you could use George Chambers' DISK DOCTOR or Larry Kenny's LRRKEN DISK EDITOR and select the tracks used option. I may get around to working this into a revision of the program.

D20 uses the LKDOS TRACK routine (trk) to set the drives head to a particular track which does put a strain on the drives.

D20 uses trk to double step the OD drives head to the approp- riate track of the DD disk. The variable g handles this. Note that the value of g is doubled for side 0 but incremented by 1 for side 1. Ex. g=8 the OD drives head is moved to track 4 Of the DD disk. G=9 the OD drives head is moved to track 5 of the DD disk. The variable ct is sent to the drive via Treg. After calling the trk routine and before calling idbuf. This is like a track counter. It is 0 for track 0, 0 for track 1, then incremented for track 2 and 3 to 1. For tracks 78 and 79 ct would be 39. This is all on the DD disk.

I have also been able to move tracks from a OD disk to a Pre- formatted DD disk. I haven't worked out how to format a DD disk using a OD drive.

02D can be found on my LKDOS unities disk version 2 in the groups LRRKEN DISK LIBRARY.

PROGRflH LISTING

10 REN LKDOS DISK UTILITY DOUBLE TO OUAO DISK CONUERSION by R.H.

20 LET trk =40001

30 LET Id bf =40108

40 LET trak =40000

50 LET Treg=18

60 LET write =40015

70 LET tomem=40050

80 LET mem=40H9

90 DIM X$(23): CLS 100 PRINT """ Double To Ouad Disk Conversion" HO INPUT "Source Drive? (0-3)" ;org: IF org<0 OR org>3 THEN GO TO 110

120 INPUT "Destination Drive? ( 0-3)";dest: IF dest<0 OR dest>3 THEN GO TO 120

130 PRINT "TAB 5; "Press ENTER To Convert"

140 IF INKEYlo"" THEN GO TO 14

150 160 165 170

g

180

trk 190 200 205 210 220

St 230 240 250 260 270

9

280

IF INKEY$=" " THEN GO TO 150 REM move directory GO SUB 610

RANDOMIZE U5R 100: GO TO or

POKE trak,0: RANDOMIZE USR

RANDOMIZE USR Idbf

RANDOMIZE USR tomem

LET sid=PEEK (mem+20)

IF dest=org THEN GO SUB 620

RRNDOMIZE USR 100: GO TO de

POKE trak,0

RRNDOMIZE USR write

IF Si d=l THEN GO TO 350

IF dest=org THEN GO SUB 610

RANDOMIZE USR 100: GO TO or

POKE trak,l: RANDOMIZE USR

trk

290 RANDOMIZE USR Idbf 300 RANDOMIZE USR tomem 310 IF dest=org THEN GO SUB 620 320 RRNDOMIZE USR 100: GO TO de St

330 POKE trak,l: RANDOMIZE USR write 340 REM move tracks 350 LET Ct=l: LET 9=2 360 IF dest=org THEN GO SUB 610 370 RANDOMIZE USR 100: GO TO or

9

380 POKE trak,2*g: RANDOMIZE US R trk 390 OUT Treg,ct 400 RANDOMIZE USR Idbf 410 RANDOMIZE USR tomem 420 IF destsorg THEN GO SUB 620 430 PRINT RT 0,8;" "; AT

0 *0; g; " ok 1 "

448 'RANDOMIZE USR 100: GO TO de St

450 POKE trak,g 460 RANDOHIZE USR write 470 IF Sid=l THEN LET CUCt+i: GO TO 590 480 IF dest=org THEN GO SUB 610 490 RANDOMIZE USR 100: GO TO or

g

500 POKE trak, ((2*g)+l) : RANDOM IZE USR trk

510 OUT Treg,ct: LET ct=ct+l

520 RANDOMIZE USR Idbf

530 RANDOMIZE USR tomem

540 PRINT AT 0,0;" ";

AT 0,0;g+l;" ok!" 550 IF dest=org THEN GO SUB 620 560 RANDOMIZE USR 100: GO TO de

St

570 POKE trak,(g+i)

580 RANDOMIZE USR write 590 LET g=g+2: IF g>=79 THEN ST OP

600 GO TO 368

610 PRINT AT 12,6; "Insert Sourc e Disk" "TAB 4; "Press ENTER To C ontinue": PAUSE 0: PRINT AT 12,4 ;x$;AT 14,4; x$: RETURN

620 PRINT AT 12,4; "Insert Desti nation Disk" "TAB 4; "Press ENTER

To Continue": PAUSE 0: PRINT AT

12,4;x$;AT 14,4;x$: RETURN

900 REM code loader

910 CLEAR 39999

920 FOR f =40800 TO 40117

930 READ C: POKE f,C

940 NEXT f

950 RUN

960 DATA 0,205,99,156,58,64 978 DATA 156,50,29,32,205,126 980 DATA 0,24,30,205,99,156 990 DATA 58,64,156,58,29,32 1000 DATA 205,126,0,205,150,156 1010 DATA 205,120,0,24,10,243 1020 DATA 205,98,0,62,11,50 1030 DATA 2,32,201,58,100,0 1040 DATA 251,201,205,99,156,33 1050 DATA 112,32,17,183,156,1 1860 DATA 0,20,237,176,205,109 1070 DATA 156,201,205,99,156,33 1080 DATA 183,156,17,112,32,1 1090 DATA 0,20,237,176,205,109 1100 DATA 156,201,33,183,156,17 1118 DATA 112,32,1,0,20,237 1120 DATA 176,201,205,99,156,205 1130 DATA 129,0,205,109,156,201 1140 DATA 205,99,156,205,123,0 1150 DATA 205,109,156,201 9999 RANDOMIZE USR 100: SAUE "d2 q.B2" LINE 900

SINC-LIKK

11

2068

MODIFYING THE 2068 LARKEN DISK TITLE by G. Chambers

The disk title that is seen on the screen when doing a TS2068 LKDOS CAT command is established at the time of formatting a disk. Often a different disk title is desired once the disk application has been established. The following paragraphs will detail how ^a disk title can be modified.

These instructions make use of the "doctor. Bl" program written by G.Chambers. This program is in the public domain and can be obtained from the Toronto Timex Sinclair Users Club.

Load the "doctor. Bl - program into the computer, then install the disk to be modified into drive 0. Using "doctor. Bl", call up track 0 of this disk by pressing the key 4, and when a track number is requested, press the 0 key.

A copy of track 0 contents (5120 bytes) will be moved into the computer buffer starting at address 50000. The buffer will also be displayed on the screen, starting at address 0 of the track.

Assuming some experience with "doctor. Bl " , we shall not dwell on it's functions except as necessary for the task at hand. Press the D key. This moves the screen display up to buffer address 5^500, where the disk title starts. Now the work begins.

Press the A key to Alter. You will be presented with a "Characters or Numbers?" query. Press the C key, to select Characters. Then, per instructions, press the Q and A keys to position the cursor opposite the address where the title change is to start. Actually, since we are going to be starting at the beginning of the disk title the cursor need not be moved. Experiment with this a bit, but then return the cursor to the top, and press the ENTER key. You will then be asked to enter a string of characters, i.e. in our case the new disk title.

If the title is to be a short one, changing it is not particularly difficult. The entry cursor in the "doctor. Bl" program has been positioned such that the first line of the entered string will contain 20 characters, corresponding to the way that LKDOS positions the title during a CAT function.

Simply type the complete title in a single goj the layout of the character string that you see on the screen is the same as will appear with a CAT of the disk.

When you have prepared the title to your satisfaction, press the ENTER key. After a short pause for POKEing the string into the buffer the screen will be re-? written to show the justnentered character string. If your string was less than 17 characters it will be complete on the screen. If greater, then press the C key momentarily to move the screen along by 17 addresses. Continue this process until you see the last few characters of your string.

When the title is to your satisfaction you must save it from the buffer, where the modification has taken place, to the track "0"

of your disk. Press the S key. You will be. asked "Same or New track". Press the S key again. A "Remove Write Protect " warning will appear on-screen. Press the ENTER key to SAVE. You may then Break out of "doctor. Bl", and do a CLS, then a disk CAT to check the results. If not happy, then press the C key (CONTINUE) momentarily, followed by the ENTER key. You should be back in the "doctor. Bl" program. Press the D key to display the start of the directory title, and start again.

There may be occasions when a more elaborate title or instructions are wanted in the directory title. This may be too difficult to do as described above. To cope with this we can enter the title a line, or a few lines, at a time. Here's how.

Enter the first string. It can be as long as is handy, one or more lines. Remember, the first line has 20 characters, maximum. In any event, after entering this string