SINC-LINK

.*

Vol.7 No. 3 May- June

S INC -LINK IS A PUBLICATION OF THE TORONTO TIMEX-SINCLAIR USERS CLUB AND IS ISSUED 6 TIMES A YEAR. COPIES OF THE NEWSLETTER ARE SI ,50 EACH FOR NON-MEMBERS. CLUB MEMBERS RECEIVE FREE COPIES AS PART OF THE $20.00 ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP FEE. A NEWSLETTER SUBSCRIPTION ONLY IS AVAILABLE FOR SI 2. 00.

NEWSLETTERS ARE EXCHANGED, FREE OF CHARGE, WITH OTHER TIMEX-SINCLAIR USERS GROUPS.

PLEASE CREDIT THIS PUBLICATION AND THE AUTHOR IF YOU COPY MATERIAL.

THE CLUB MEETS ON THE FIRST WEDNESDAY OF EACH MONTH AT FOREST HILLS COLLEGIATE INSTITUTE, 7 JO EGLINTON AVE. W. , TORONTO.

SEND CORRESPONDANCE TO:

Attention; SINC-LINK EDITOR TORONTO TIMEX-SINCLAIR USERS CLUB, 14 RICHOME COURT, SCARBOROUGH, ONTARIO, CANADA M1K 2Y1

ZZ3 9/2231 TS1888/1588 PC3388 ! TS2868 f 5PECIBIH

3.1 f

LABIH I/T

H\ :; l

_H ~

TtffiOITO Tim-SIICUJE OKIES CUB

SUPER SPRING ISSUE

pg.

2

Editorial /Jwfejf +0 LP Bob » s Notebook „sc(LIPr So^r

pg.

3,4

pg.

5

Artist II Mod.

pg.

6

QL Notes

pg.

7

Z88 User Group

pg.

8

Extra 2068 Ram

pg.

9

Disk Drive Notes

pg.

10

QLips

pg.

11,12

2068,ZX81 Programs j

pg-

13,14

QL Clock Program

pg.

15

PCB Transfer Film

pg.

16

Larken Utility Review

pg.

17

Larken Software

pg.

18

CATS Fest Review

pg.

19.

QL Sound

pg.

20

Letters

pg.

21

More of Bob's Notebook

pg.

22

Larken Info

pg.

23

QL Val

pg.

24

Larken Hardware

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS:

PRESIDENT TREASURER SECRETARY ACTIVITIES: TAPE LIBRARIAN ZX81: TAPE LIBRARIAN 2068: TAPE LIBRARIAN QL: PAPER LIBRARIAN: NEWSLETTER: LIAISON OFFICER: ( Out-of-town members )

JEFF TAYLOR ( 244-8583 ) BILL LAWSON ( 444-8772 ) GEORGE CHAMBERS ( 751-7559 )

RENE BRUNEAU ( 531-9749 )

■I ii ii

RENATO ZANNESE ( 635-6536 )

HUGH HOWIE ( 634-4929 )

GREG ROBINS ( 920-7747 )

JEFF TAYLOR ( 244-8583 )

GEORGE CHAMBERS » 14 RICHOME COURT,

SCARBOROUGH . ONTARIO. M1K-2Y1

( 416-751-7559 )

TORONTO TIMEX-SINCLAIR USERS CLUB

14 RICHOME COURT , SCARBOROUGH, ONTARIO, CANADA MIX 2Y1

Editorial

News letter

I was going to start off by apologizing for getting this issue out a little late. Then I thought, "Why am I apologizing? I haven't done anything wrong." So here isn't an apology.

The reason this issue is a couple of weeks late is because several of the club members, myself included, went to the Capital Area Time* Sinclair (CATS) Users Group Computer Fest in Washington, D.C. Since the fest occurred after the May 5th TTSUC meeting and normal Sine-Link release date, the Exec felt it better to delay the May-June issue and to include members' comments about the fest in this issue rather than reporting on it in the July -August issue. Just trying to stay current .

CATS Fest

The big news is that six of our members made our respective ways down to Washington for an enjoyable if rushed May 5th, 6th & 7th weekend. I would have to say that the fest was a success for the organizers with visitors and exhibitors from as far away, as British Columbia, Oregon and Cal if ornia .

The fest was a success for us too. Each of us spent more than we planned on, but not one of us regretted doing so. I am now the owner of a used QL, a graphics tablet with software, a fabulous RGB monitor, ZX81 hardware plus assorted software, magazines and books. A financial disaster but I'm still grinning so it can't be that bad.

Sad to see the departure of a vendor such as Zebra Systems, thanks for years of great hard-and-sof tware support.

On a lighter note, Hugh Howie is particularly happy about this fest. He now has four new QL members !

See George ' s comments for more CATS Fest info.

Well done, CATS!

In case you haven't noticed, we are presenting another large issue. I am really pleased with the response from our writers. In fact the only reason why this issue isn't larger is because its weight would cost us more in postage prices. So to those writers whose articles don't appear in this issue, don't worry, your names will appear in print in the July-August news letter .

I'm also happy to announce that this edition was assembled by Renato Zannese and Greg Robins. This makes my job of producing the newsletter much easier. I welcome any aid or suggestions which will improve the quality of our publication. Just let us know with a card or a letter.

QLers Note

Last issue we ran a questionnaire asking QLers to comment. One of the questions may have been misleading. Allow me to point out that our QL orogram library (as well as the ZX81 and TS2068 library) contains only public domain programs. If Quanta members wish to exchange cartridges they do so privately. The Toronto Timex-Sinclair Users Club will not knowingly distribute copywritten programs without prior permission from the authors .

Non-Canadian Readers Take Note!

We have been receiving a lot of cheques written out to non-Canadian banks. These are usually for about $2.00 for issues of Sine-Link. Since our bank charges us more to process the cheque than they are worth I would ask that readers use a POSTAL MONEY ORDER instead of a? cheque. Also, please do not send postage stamps. We cannot use foreign stamps. Thanks for your cooperation .

BOB'S NOTEBOOK

At the club see ting in April, I promised a utility which wcuid allow the data in my disk indexer (see Smc-Link Nov-Dec 87 p. 6) to be printed on the wide printer with eight entries per line in condensed font. Listings 1 and 2 below will da the job. But here are some explanatory notes.

Listing 1 is straight-forward and should present no problems.

Listing 2*. Variable <ff> means farm feed and controls the ejection of the paper after 55 lines are printed. You may wish to alter this paraateter to some other number of lines. Variable <lf> means line feed and is used to insert a line feed after eight records are printed.

In line 3001 i the address 37825 equals 37799 + 26 so as to skip over the first two dl items which contain the <££ARCH IS COMPLETED) message. The address 37799 is contingent upon your conpilation coming up with 37797 as the start of the data area for d$ in the compilation. If it is any other valuei you will have to adjust the 37325 & 5602A- addresses accordingly.

Line 3007 inserts a space after each file name to separate it from the disk number; similarlyi line 3017 inserts two spaces between records. Line 3010 skips over the asterisks in the d$ array? line 3012 stops action and returns to the leader at line 1100 when it encounters a space in the second place in the file name.

In the Jan-Feb 1939 issue, I provided a utility uhicn would allow the sorting of lists (of information) entered into the Tasword. As I explained beforei such lists can be birthdays and anniversaries, things to do, disk names & numbers, anything you iike as long as the entries do not exceed 64 characters in ■ength.

In listing 3 and 4 below, you will find a similar utility for doing the same thing with MSCRIPT. Listing 3 is the loader and remains in BASIC, while listing 4 is cast compiled using Timachine. Here are some notes en these two programs.

If ycu don't have the taswide utility, you should leave out line 98 in listing 3 and make line 240 in listing 4 read: 'CLS: BEEP oa, VAL '10': FOR i=n TO s-i: PRINT d*(i>: NEXT i).

In line 510 in listing 3, the PEEKs get the value of variable <b> in the compiled cade <,mssort.Co; <b> is the length of cade to be saved. If you get a different location for variable <b) when you do your compilation, you should change these PEEK addresses accordingly. Injine 100, I put the words -MSCRIPT SORT) in inverse characters and followed these with 24 spaces. I also put the words -BLOCK SAVE) in inverse cnaracters in line HQ of listing 4.

Lines Q4 and 530 are set up to return action to my Ramdisk; you may change these to go back to the current menu in your disk drive by changing <60 TO 4> to the drive number of your. choice.

LISTING 1

CrxAxi-P.t

1000 CLEAR 29000: RANDOMIZE USR 100: LOAD 'indxLP.Cc'CODE 63CC0

1010 RANDOMIZE USR VAL *1Q0" : OPEN WAL V/dd*

1012 PRINT »VAL '4": OPEN tVAL

'IP*

1015 PRINT ftVAL '4': POKE VAL ' 16090' i VAL '135': PRINT ttVAL *4': POKE VAL ' 16094* , VAL '8': LP R I NT

1017 OUT 127,15 s«&- cok5o&)Seo pmut mods

1013 GO SUB 1200

1O20 RANDOMIZE USR 63000

1103 STOP

1200 INPUT 'what index- file? enter full name of file..." LINE 1$

1210 RANDOMIZE USR 100: LOAD UC0DE 1220 RETURN 1900 STOP

2000 RANDOMIZE USR VAL " 100" t SAVE •indxlP.Bb' LINE VAL '1000'

LISTING 2

if)

JxLP.Cc (itJDXLP.SS)

60 REM ! LPRINT

70 REM ! LIST

80 REM ! INT +lf,a,b,c,ff

90 REM !USR 63C00

1000 RANDOMIZE USR 100: OPEN *3,*lp*

1010 RANDOMIZE USR 100: POKE 16090,135

1020 RANDOMIZE USR 100: POKE 16094,3

1030 OUT 127,15: LPRINT (c^f"^

I 2000 REM ! OPEN #

3000 LET lf=N0T PI^LEf"ff=NOT PI: LPRINT

3001 FOR a=37925rt0 56024 STEP 13

3002 IF if =8 THEN LPRINT : LET ff»ff+i: LET lf=N0T PI

3003 IF ff=55 THEN OUT 127,12: LET ff=Q: LPRINT : GO

a

°-Vi>i eg to gO

TO 3030 ^ V__

3005 FOR b=l TO 13 3007 IF b=lO THEN LPRINT 8 '? 3010 LPRINT CHRS PEEK (a+b) AND PEEK (a+b)<>42? 3012 IF PEEK (a+l)=32 THEN LPRINT : STOP 3015 NEXT b

3017 LPRINT *

3018 LET lf=lf*l 3030 !€XT a

L 104:0 OiT!

,T\yrLr dot vri, 65 : out 9

LISTING 3 rfi

90 CLS : PRINT 'MSCRIPT SORT by Bob Mitchell. * " "Prior to using this utility^ SAVE the BLOCK to be sorted, using the Kscript block markers.'

91 PRINT "Calculate the length between the block- markers and have this at hand.'

92 PRINT "This utility will sort up to 200 lines with max length of 64 chars. Each line must end with a line feed (code 13). '

93 INPUT 'i=cont. 0=menu 'jem 0

94 IF NOT cm THEN PRINT #4: 60 TO M PRINT #4: NEW 97 PRINT SVAL *4*: LOAD "assort. Cc1 CODE

© 98 PRINT #VAL '4': LOAD 'taswi.Cx'CODE

t

SINC-LINK

3/72

2068

iUU PAPER ..SSI PI:J0RDER S5N PI: INK VAL *9': CLS : INPUT I'flSCRIPT SORT]! wt 24 spaces here) BLOCK SAVE file name? !ms 6) LINE a$

105 INPUT 'drive? '0-3) 'idrv: PRINT S4: 60 TO 5rv

HQ PRINT *4: LOAD nS+'.CT'CODE 47050

HQ RANDOMIZE USR VAL '29000'

500 CLS : BEEP S6N PI, VAL '10': INPUT "name fat save' max 6 '? LINE si

510 PRINT *4: SAVE si+'.CT'CODE 47C5CPEEK 3G3S6+25fc*PEEK 3QSS7

520 CLS : PRINT 'BLOCK saved? now load MSCRIPT and LOAD relevant file. Delete old BLOCK? use <ADD> to LOAD new BLOCK."- STOP

530 PRINT INOT PI? 'Press a key for menu. "• PAUSE NOT Pi: PRINT WAL '4': 50 TO VAL */": PRINT WAL •4". MEW #

55U CLEAR : PRINT 34: SAVE ' assart. Bb* LINE VAL

"57Q"

5t0 STOP

57U RANDOMIZE USR VAL ' ICQ" ' OPEN IVAL 'AVdd' 580 60 TO VAL '90'

LISTING 4-

50 REM ! LIST ^SOrf.Cc tO REM ! LPS INT 70 REM !LEN hS<=66

90 REM ! INT *b,oa,cb,sf ,a,n, l, j,s,ss, t 90 REM IUSR 29000 100 REN ! OPEN *

120 INPUT 'length of SLOCK SAVE^ <= 12800 "b 130 PRINT 'Storing CODE in ARRAY*" FLASH 1? f' stana-by... 1 140 Dirt df (200,64)

145 LET oa=l : LET ob=2: LET sf=64: LET a=47050

150 LET s=oa

160 LET n=s

170 FOR i=a+i TO a+b

180 FOR j=l TO 63

190 LET di(s,j)=Cu0! PEEK i

195 IF PEEK 1=13 THEN GO TO 210

196 IF i=a+b THEN LET s=s-i: 50 TO 240

197 LET i=i+oa 200 NEXT j 210 LET S=5+C2 220 NEXT i

h'x2*Q CLS : BEE? oa,VAL '10': RANDOMIZE USR 64300: FOR i=n TO s-1 : PRINT CHRS 3?d$(i): NEXT i ^50 INPUT *l=sort 0=save? ';==: IF NOT S3 THEN 60 TO VAL "4^0"

255 INPUT 'sort on which col.?. (1-63) 'Jt 260 CLS : PRINT 'sorting on col. '?t" FLASH l?' stand-by...': GO SUB VAL '300': GO TO VAL '240" 290 REM shell-faun- sort 300 LET sn=e 310 LET sn=INT (sn/ob) 320 IF sr.voa THEN CLS : RETURN 330 IF sn/ob=INT isn/cbi THEN LET sn=sn+oa 340 FOR i=n TO e-sn 350 LET mm=i

360 IF dftuhft TO K«t$(m+sn,t TO ) THEN 60 TO VAL *42Q"

370 LET h$=dS(miiJ 380 LET d$(wa)=d*Uro+sn) 390 LET dS(mst+sn)=hS 400 LET iws=iwi-sn

410 IF isffl/O THEN 60 TO VAL '360'

420 NEXT i

430 GO TO VAL ^iO*

440 CLS : PRINT 'storing sorted file for SAVE... FLASH 1?' stand-by... ': LET s=n: POKE a, 14: FOR i=a+l TO a+b

450 FOR j=S5N PI TO VAL '63*

460 POKE i , CODE d$(s,j)

465 IF CODE d$(s,j)=13 THEN 60 TO 480

446 IF i=a+b THEN STOP

468 LET i=i+aa

470 NEXT j

480 LET s=s+oa 1 490 NEXT i

This is a little postscript for indxLP above. Use this listing to change the line spacing and when used with condensed font, this will allow up to 1400 records to be printed on one sheet of paper (both sides). The DATA in lines 200 and 300 are for ay Fastest 80 printer. Use your printer's manual to get the equivalents for your machine.

set Is. 31

10 REM change line spacing 15 GO TO 100 ^ -s ^ °" Z.ZP) ., 20 LET a=IN 127: IF?' a-237/HEN RETURN 22 50 TO 20 v 100 as : INPUT 'l=narrosi» abnormal', Is 110 IF Is THEN 60 SUB 2D: RESTORE 200: READ j: FOR i=l TO j: 60 SUB 20: READ k: OUT 127, k: SOT i 120 IF NOT Is THEN GO SUB 20: RESTORE 'Z2' READ j: FOR i=l TO j: GO SUB 2D: READ k: OUT 127, k: NEXT i

130 PRINT 'Line spacing »?{ 'Normal' AND NOT Is) H 'Narrow' AND 1 s)

140 PRINT 'Press a key for Ramdisk Menu': PAUSE 0: RANDOMIZE USR 100 : 60 TO 4: RANDOMIZE USR 100: NEW 200 DATA 3,27,65,8 Wiz. inc^^r 4er<^ 300 DATA 2,27,50 Vc meK ^^er--f«A 400 STOP

1000 RANDOMIZE USR 100: SAVE 'setls.Bi* LINE 100

Disk Name : V01 Archives

Seal-permanent storage of programs under development. "890316.

indxLP.Cc rcpns.CT rcptas.CT index. £2 sysvar.Bp

001 rep 001 rcpIN.Bl 001 rcpaex.CT 001 mdxLP.Bb 001 1685-38.

001 index. Bx 001 r cp IN. 32 001 proseq.Bl

001 uesbrr.Cl

002 setls

001 002 001 001 001

LARKEN LKDOS 1986 Track/Side 040/002 Total Files 015 Free Blocks 062

DISK V01

DATE 890409

A CLOSE- SPACED LABEL

STNC-I TNK

2068

Modifing ARTIST II for the LARKEN DISK SYSTEM

Artist II is a great Spectrum graphic program. It has so many features that:, it is the best program avail iable.

Below is the basic listing showing the necessary modifications required to be us e d with the LARKEN D I SK SYSTEM . Enter the lines as indicated and delete the other lines in the program.

Find the menu which has the exit to basic function. Edit the lines and then ENTER SOTO 1. Do an NMI of the Program* Rename * the program to ARTIST .02 . That f s al 1 .

The program has error proofing in the SAVE » LOAD and ERASE features. The program can send a copy to a large printer, but it has to be EPSON compatable.

Version LKDOS 1.0 04/39

A disk copv <3 1/4 ssdd) is avail ible for $7.00

Mr. Renato Zannese

613 Roding Street Do wnsv i ew , On t ar i o Canada M3M 2A6

1 POKE 23676,1: RANDOMIZE USR 100: OPEN #37MLP": RANDOMIZE US

R 100: POKE 16093,32

2 LET n=VAL " 1 " : BORDER PEEK '.'AL "23033" : RANDOMIZE USR VAL " 37793": LET D=PEEK VAL "23122" : LET A=PEEK VAL "23120": LET B=VA L "49152": LET C=VAL "6912": 60 SUB VAL "3": GO TO VAL "2"

3 IF A=VAL "207" THEN COPY : RETURN

4 IF A< VAL "207" AND A > VAL "2 02" THEN IF PEEK VAL " 23676 "»n THEN GO TO 45

3 CLS : IF A=VAL "215" THEN PRINT "LOAD": PRINT : GO SU B 90

6 IF A=VAL "214" THEN PRINT " SAVE ": PRINT : GO SUB 96

3 IF A=VAL "212" THEN RANDOM IZE USR 100: CAT : PAUSE NOT PI: RETURN

9 LET B=VAL "16334": IF A=VAL "1" THEN GO TO VAL "70"

10 LET B=VAL "47372": LET C=VA L "396": IF A=VAL "203" THEN GO

TO VAL "70"

11 IF A=VAL "209" THEN GO TO VAL "30"

12 IF A=VAL "211" THEN PRINT "ERA S E ": PRINT : GO SUB VA L "100"

13 LET C=VAL "763": IF A=VAL " 2" THEN GO SUB VAL "42": GO TO VAL "70"

14 IF A=VAL "3" THEN GO SUB V AL "42": GO TO VAL "30"

15 IF A=VAL "210" THEN LET D= ABS <D-n>

20 IF A=VAL "202" THEN STOP 40 RETURN

42 INPUT "Which Font ";b: LET b=PEEK ( 2607 1 +b+b ) +VAL " 256 " *PEE K <26072+b+b): RETURN

45 IF PEEK VAL " 23676 "=n THEN POKE VAL "23120" , A- VAL "203": R AN DOM IZE USR VAL "64800" : RETURN

50 RETURN

60 RANDOMIZE USR 100: CAT

65 INPUT "FILENAME (6 CHARS) : " ? A*

66 IF LEN A$>6 THEN GO TO 63

67 RETURN

70 PRINT " LOAD ": GO SUB VAL "60"

74 RANDOMIZE USR 100! LOAD A$+ " .Cx"C0DE B: RETURN

30 PRINT " SAVE " s GO SUB VAL "60"

34 RANDOMIZE USR 100: SAVE A$+ " . C x " CODE B , C : RETURN

90 INPUT "Load File <Y/N)?";a*

92 IF a$="N" OR a$="n" THEN R ETURN

94 GO SUB 70: RETURN

96 INPUT "Save File (Y/N)?";a$

97 IF a$="N" OR a$="n" THEN R ETURN

93 GO SUB SOs RETURN

100 INPUT "Erase a File ?(Y/N)" ;a$

102 IF a$="N" OR a$="n" THEN R ETURN 104 GO SUB 60

106 RANDOMIZE USR 100: ERASE AS +".Cx": RETURN

SINC-LINK

QL QL QL 9L QL 8L Ql_ QL QL QL QL QL QL 9L SL QL QL QL QL QL QL 8L QL QL

IN OUR LAST ISSUE I WAS TELLING YOU ABOUT PURCHASING AN R. G. B. MONITOR THAT DIDN'T WORK WITH MY QL. I AM HAPPY TO BE ABLE TO TELL YOU THAT AFTER MUCH EFFORT BY MANY MEMBERS IT WORKS GREAT. FROM THE DATE OF PURCHASE TO DATE OF OPERATION WAS FORTY DAYS, I'M NOT SURE WHETHER THATS A SIGN OF SOMETHING OR NOT.

THE PROBLEM WAS MAINLY IN THE CONNECTION OUT OF THE QL. FROM THE LITERATURE IT DEPENDED WHAT MODEL OF QL YOU HAD. MY PERSONAL OPINION IS, •I DON'T KNOW!. AT THE MARCH MEETING OF THE CLUB IT WAS DECIDED TO HOLD A MEETING OF THE QL GROUP AT HUGH HOWIE'S HOME SO THAT THE CLUB MEMBERS IN THE HAMILTON BURLINGTON AREA COULD ATTEND. HUGH HAD ALSO PURCHASED THE SAME MODEL * RGB' AS I HAD, BUT HIS WAS WORKING GREAT. WE ARE AGREED THAT THE CREDIT FOR THIS GOES TO SCHENNELLY STOUGHTON, CLUB MEMBER FROM LINDSAY, WHO MADE UP HUGH'S CABLE. IN TALKING WITH THE GUYS IT WAS AGREED THAT I WOULD TAKE MY CABLE TO THE MEETING TO SEE IF ANY ONE HAD AN IDEA AS TO WHY I WAS HAVING SO MUCH DIFFICULTY. AFTER THE BUSINESS PART WAS OVER JEFF TAYLOR (CLUB PRES.) SENEN RACKI AND MIKE FERRIS (QLers FROM HAMILTON), SENEN ALSO BOUGHT ONE OF THE SAME MONITORS AND WAS HAVING PROBLEMS USING THE TV MODE. WITH THE USE OF HUGH'S EQUIPMENT THEY WENT TO WORK ON THE CABLE AND AFTER A FEW ATTEMPTS THEY HAD MY CABLE WORKING ON HUGH'S SET. 'THANKS FELLOWS.

JEFF AND I LEFT THE MEETING AROUND 10;30. JEFF WAS SURE I WOULD WANT TO CALL GEORGE CHAMBERS, ON ARRIVAL AT TORONTO, TO GO TO GEORGE'S AND TEST THE CABLE ON MY UNIT. AFTER MUCH DISCUSSION I CONVINCED HIM, NOT REALLY, THAT IT COULD WAIT UNTIL GEORGE WOULD BE FREE TO SPEND SOME TIME AT IT. AS IT TURNED OUT, MUCH TIME WAS NEEDED. THE CABLE DIJN'T WORK ON MY SET. THE SIGNAL WAS COMING THROUGH BUT IT WOULD NOT SETTLE DOWN TO A FIRM PICTURE. I POINTED OUT THAT HUGH HOWIE, ON ONE OF OUR OTHER ATTEMPTS, WONDERED ABOUT THE CONNECTION AT THE MONITOR END OF THE CABLE. GEORGE CHECKED THIS AGAIN BUT IT MADE NO DIFFERENCE. THEN HE DECIDED TO CHECK UNDER THE UNIT. WHEN HE TILTED THE UNIT FORWARD THE DOUBLE WINDOW COLOUR AND ALL APPEARED AS IT SHOULD. GEORGE PUT A CLAMP ON THE CABLE AND IT HAS WORKED EVER SINCE. THANKS GEORGE AND THANKS MARJORIE, ( MAR JORIE GEORGE'S WIFE). WE SPENT SO MUCH TIME GETTING THE UNIT GOING MARJORIE HAD US STAY FOR SUPPER. SEE WHAT FAITH CAN DO (WITH LOTS OF HELPERS) . IT WAS WORTH THE WAIT. IT IS BEAUTIFUL. THE COLOURS ARE TREMENDOUS. THE TEXT IS VERY SHARP. THE PRICE WAS RIGHT.

P.S. IT IS NOW ENCASED IN A SUIT BOX SPECIALLY CUT AND PASTED. W K (BILL) LAWSON

DO YOU KNOW THAT THE KEYWORD - LIST - CAN GIVE YOU A HARD COPY OF A PROGRAM LISTING? YEP, YA GOTTA HAVE A PRINTER. TRY IT, WITH OR WITHOUT LINE NUMBERS.

lO OPEN #4,SER1 20 LIST *4 30 CLOSE 4

WRITE AND SHARE YOUR, "TRIALS tc TRIUMPHS", WITH US. WKL

SINC-LINK

A Z88 USERS GROUP by G. Chambers

One of our members, Phil Hudsmith, tells me there is a Sinclair Z88 computer users group in England, which welcomes overseas members*

They put out a newsletter called the Z88 EPROM. Cost for a year subscription (6 issues) to the newsletter is 14 pounds for overseas subscribers. (For some reason the subscription price to USA is 12 Pounds* Doesn't seem right, does it?)

Anyway, for anyone who is interested, the address isi

Dept S - Z88 USERS CLUB 68 Wellington Long Eaton, Nottingham,

United Kingdom NG10 4NG

*****************

LARKEN-CRACKING SPECTRUM PROGRAMS BY G. CHAMBERS

In the last issue I described how to crack the program TECHNICIAN TED. It used a quite involved procedure to save the code from disk to tape, then back, into the computer. Since then I have written two utilities which simplify the process considerably.

The first programs is called "crackr . B1" . It searches the disk for the named program, then saves it to tape on a track-by-track basis. The first track is saved starting at address 24000 1.1 use 9-track NMI-saves) .

A companion utitity, called "saverl . Bl" , loads the tape back into the computer, from whence it can be saved to disk, or tape .

The "saverl . Bl" utility has several interesting features about it. Becaus#e the program to be loaded from tape starts at 24000, there is not much room for a BASIC loader program. This was solved by having the Basic program load some m/C into the printer buffer at address 23296. This m/c does two things. Part of the code contains a LINE DELETE function, while the balance of the code is a tape loader utility.

After installing the m/c the Basic program makes a USR call to delete all but one key line of itself, lowers RAMtop to address 23999, then makes a second USR call. The second USR call, to address 23300, loads the programs previously saved to tape, back into- the computer.

All that needs to be done now is to locate the starting USR address. The hard part, that is !

*******************************

SINC-LINK

INTERFACE FOR RAM IN T/S 2068 I/O PORTS

Larry Crawford 357 Reynolds Rd London Ontario Canada N6K 2P3

Exoanding memory into the EXROM and DOCK banks is reasonably simpie ( SWN 2/3, 3/4). However, one must be very cautious uinen enabling chunks of RAM in these banks to avoid interfering with the operation of the system. Far example, if you want to use any of the ROM routines, you will need to be sure that the appropriate chunks of Home bank are enabled before you call them. Some hardware add-ons also use chunks of EXROM and Dock banks and could get in the way. There is also the complication of an Interruption fielder which we needn't go into here.

The simplest way around these problems is tQ leave chunks 0 to 3 of Home bank enabled at ail times and to enable only chunks 4 to 7 of any other banks added. With an appropriate interface, E::aansion banks can be added and concroilea through the I/O □arts. Nineteen carts are used by the 2268 system. by a MODEM, and a few others may be used by other hardware, leaving over 2B0 ports availaole for RAM. Even at only 32K per port, that amounts to over 6.5 MEGAbytes which can be imolemented without getting in the way of the system's normal operation.

For examole. if E;:oansion bank 01 is to be enaoled, OUT 1,3 would cause Din 14 (cutout I) of Ul to go LOW. This transition from HIGH to LOW causes the 0 NOT outout (pin 13) of the flip-flap < U2 ) to go LOW. This in turn enables the second 74 133 (U3). A small LED connected to pin 5 indicates that the bank is active. Its address pins are connected to A13. A 1 A & A15. Thus it acts as a chunk decoder, i.e. output * enables chunk 4, etc. This decoding is for memory locations, not the chunk selection register. In the command OUT 1,0 that was used, the 0 is a dummy PArametBr needed to satisfy the structure of BASIC. Anu value uo to 255 could have been used. In M/C, the instructions LD C.01 and OUT (C),A would accomplish the same thing. There is no need to assign a value to register A. It is not decoded.

To disable the Expansion bank, OUT 0.0 causes pin 15 of Ul to go LOW (and incidentally pin 14 to go HIGH) This forces pin 8 (Q NOT) of the second flip-flap of U2 to go LOW. The first flip-flop is RESET, causing pin 13 to go HIGH thus disabling the chunk decoder. All its outouts go HIGH, disabling all the 6264 SRAMs connected to it. An OUT 244.0 will now return the computer to normai Home bank operations.

By connecting pin 27 of the 6264 sockets to the 5v rail instead of the WR NOT line, it is passible to install 27123 EPROMs instead of SRAMs. In this way, all sorts of M/C routines could be called up with a minimum of fuss.

Each Expansion pank enabled in this way acts exactly like a Dock bank. Therefore, its active chunks can be controlled through I/O part 244. For example, OUT 2,0 : OUT 244.16 would enable chunk 4 of Expansion bank 02. OUT 244,0 would disaole it. The Dock bank has priority over Home Bank. Thus any cnunks enabled in an Expansion bank automatically disable the corresponding chunks in Home bank. OUT 244,240 would enable chunks 4 to 7 of an active Expansion bank.

The circuit given here uses a 74LS13S to decode the I/O port addresses. It can therefore control 7 additional banks at memory ( 224K at 32K per bank). A 74LS154 decoder would permit 15 Expansion banks for 480K of extra RAM. Additional decoders could be added, of course, to control even more banks.

CONSTRUCTION

A 4"* 4.5" board will hold 64K. I used a one-sided board with a 4* x 0.5" strip shavea to half thickness glued into a matching notch in the main board to make the necessary two-sided edge connector. All the tracks possible were laid out including solder pads along the too edge to make it easy to attach a second board behind the first with short jumpers. The second board will not require Ul nor edge connectors. After etching and installing the sockets and bypass capacitors. I made the rest of the connections with wire wrao wire soldered point-to- point. I sprayed the oottom of the board with clear laauer to hold the numerous little wires in place. It Plugs into an Oliger expansion board slot.

HOW IT WORKS

When the OUT command is used in BASIC, or the OUT (C),A instruction in M/C, the number of the I/O port is put onto address lines A0 to A7. Then the IORQ and WR lines go '-0W simultaneously. When they are both LOW. the first 7413S iUl) decoder is enabled. It decodes adaress lines A0, Al, & A2 and oulis one of its S outputs LOW. This LOW output is usea to select one of 7 passible Expansion banks.

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STNC-I TNK

riLL VOU EUER WANTED TO KNOW ON THE CP RE AND FEEDING OF YOUR DISK DRIUE I S3

ft r e v i ew o f two man ua is - D 15 K SEP'.-1 ICE MANUAL III and THE DISK DRIUE TUTORIAL both written by Jo h n J . U i I l i ams .. M5EE . published by C0N5UMERTR0NIC5 CO., 2011 Crescent Dr.. P.O. Drawer 537, ft i. amogo rdo New Mexico 33310 USft

Uhen I first entered the wonder world of the d i s k drive; I felt as thou ah I had entered a whole new world that spoke a foreign tongue. Having a curious mind, I learned about TT/SUG and joined hoping to be enlightened in the use of this wonderful addition t o my 2063 . The mo r e I learned, the more interested I became in just how this equipment worked. I asked George Chambers if he or someone in the Club knew of any books or manuals concerning the disk drive -units. By r e t u r n ma i I he sent me an advertisement from CON3UMERTRON ICS and I sent for 2 of their publications.

DISK DRIUE TUTOR IftL i2nd Edit.) is a 23 page manual that starts out in very general terms and tells about different drives and disk sizes and adds some advice on what you can do and what you shouldn't do yourself regarding servicing your disk drive.

Chapter 2 gives a short history of disk drives and the companies that make them. The various type o f d r i v e s f r om the old 3 inch to the newer 3 inch disk drives are explained as well as the number or" tracks that have evolved.

Mixing and matching or" drives dealt with and what can happe if you try to format a disk t more tracks than a disk can r or write and the damage it c a do to your drive unit head. T stepper and spindle mo t o r s a r e explained in detail as is the c o n e i e v e r assembly. Each of the chapters is well covered with d i a g r ams and picture of the i be in a discussed. These are ve readable diagrams, unlike so many "How To" manuals.

1

;n o

e a d n

he

t em ry

Chapter 3 gets into detail of the disk itself - how the tracks are set and how the sector on a disk is arranged. Even a tip on how to modify a disk if you have a 53 drive and want to use the other side of a D 3 disk to s a v e 50"; o f y o u r disk price!

Ch spur 4. goes into s ome o f the technicalities of interfacing, ft ieq u e n c e o f con t r cue r o p e r a t i o n is gone through step by step and d i a g r a m s of several brands of interfaces are decribed.

Chapter 5 describes the format process and explains the anatomy

0 f a disk with b i ow up d i a g r ams . IBM, ftPPLE and COMMODORE format families are discussed with the differences described. Clock and data timing char t s a re c I e a r I y illustrated along with density charts for single and double density and l or 2 sided disks.

Chapter 6 gets into compatabil-

1 t y or the inc omp a t a b i 1 1 y of one system to another. The uploading

a n d d o w n i o a d i n g u s i n g the m ode m for data files. Protection types such as passwords or access code and the use of bogus sectors and the problem of preventing honest backup for the user are brought out in this chapter, ft section

called COPY -BY -FILE VS. BACKUP

describes the differences in the two methods of copying from an original disk.

Chapter 7 covers recommendations in 19 instances with names and addresses of suppliers of disk drives and disks as well as the names and addresses of repair or ma i n t e n a c e f i rms .

CONSUMERTRGN ICS CO. repairs diSK drives FREE: They diagnose the problem and r&paic the unit and if it can be fixed it will be and then is shipped back. If it is not repairable they will send it back to you. They do this to improve their expertise in this area. They do NOT sell drives or parts. They also accept broken drives, parts or manuals so they can further educate THEMSELUES!

ft l l in ail - this tutorial and well involved.

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DISK SERUICE MftNUftL III is a 33 page manual plus an 3 page DISK DRIUE MftNUftL plus an 3 page DISK ADDENDUM .

ft list pretty manua I Chap .

0 f t h e table of contents well covers this superb

1 Gene r a l

II Operation advice

III Error messages IU Diagnostics and

Troubleshooting

u Maintenance

u I Sp e e d ftd .jus trne n t

U II R -u Head a I i g nme n t

U hi Electronics & Repair

IX Miscellaneous repair

x Drive t e s t s t a t ion

XI Repair techniques

XII Drive analysis

s o f twa re critique x III Drive mo d i fications

APPENDIX ft -- GLOSSARY

Th i S is a

m a n u a i for interested inside the to do when and not ju w r o n a those

go

r"

eat nuts and bolts those that are really i n wh at takes place disk drive and what something goes wrong, t when something does but how to prevent so m e things f r om g o i n g w r o n g

by preventative ma intenance

ftg ain there are good well as photos of dr n urn be r o f c h arts an d v i ews of the drive h the parts under disc ADDENDUM is an updat DISK DRIUE MANUAL ha

o f ma nufacturers add terminology list. A devoted to the clean drive and the adjus t drive speed. Lubrica paragraph on the T r a and End Stop fill- ou set of ma n u a is .

diagrams as i v e units. A

e x p i o d e d e l p identify ussion. The e and the s a listing r esses and a section is ing of the me n t of the t ion and a ck OO sensor t this fine

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STNr_l TNK

9

QLi ps

by -Hi Howie

Don't know if you have ever noticed it, but the QL actuaiiy gives you warning some tine before it runs out of memory.

If you are ever working on an Unexpanded QL, as you get near to the point of running out of memory, the QL starts to SLOW DOWN, not very noticeable at first, but eventually it is very obvious. The cursor just seems to chug along the line as if it were running out of steam, as it really is. Makes you want to give it a hand and move it physically.

The first time I came across this phenomena I was working QUILL, and in the process of editting the document, I became annoyed at the speed at which the cursor was moving along the^line, it was painfully slow, so much so that I gave up and went to bed.

Next day I loaded the document in. and I thought it was not loading, thought I was going to get one of those wonderful messages 'Bad or changed medium', but eventually it was loaded and I continued working. A short time later it was dead slow and stop, then 'Out of Memory ' .

Have you ever had one of those old spring loaded hand cranked record players? The spring is just about wound down, and the record goes slower and slower, and it goes out with a grooooaaan. That's how it is. Don't mean to make you show your age! Wind up the old spring and listen to that 'Speedup* (We did not call it acceleration, in those days)

Luckily I had purchased the 512 Expanderam. So 1 saved the document, switched off, installed the 512, loaded up, and in seconds flat I was tearing around all over the place. Just like stepping out of an old clunker into a Jag and putting your foot to the floor. Whoosh.. .you're gone...

Which is one thing you should remember, if you are installing or removing anything in that expansion slot at the left of the QL. SWITCH IT OFF. There are so many pins and ports in that small area, it is very easy to make a slight error, (apart from the voltage a urge ) and bang goes a few more dollars.

Maybe that ! s what ' a wrong with me , I'm running out of memory, at least I am gooing a lot slower than I used to.

You know those fancy little doo-thickey things which you have, to carry all the info in your QL? Those gadgety little things you ALWAYS take out of their cases the wrong way up? Then You have to switch them around to insert them? Why not try this?

The end cap of your cartridge